NIGERIA’S PICOMSS, US AFRICOM COLLABORATE ON COASTAL RADAR AND MONITORING SYSTEM

Air Chief Marshal Oluseyi Petinrin, Nigeria's Chief of Defence Staff

Air Chief Marshal Oluseyi Petinrin, Nigeria’s Chief of Defence Staff

During the month of July 2011, the Presidential Implementation Committee on Maritime Safety and Security (PICOMSS) announced the acquisition and installation of hi-tech surveillance gadgets with a range of 99 nautical miles to cover the nation’s coastal waters.

The first consignment of equipment has been installed in Lagos. Already, radar, Close Circuit Camera (CCC) and Automated Identification System (AIS) have been mounted on a 50 meter-high mast. One of the sophisticated systems has already been installed around the Bar Beach area on the Victoria Island to cover the Lagos channel.

The system has the capacity to work round-the-clock; courtesy of solar and wind powered devices. Investigations revealed that the radar is able to monitor the movement of ships and other watercraft as far out to sea as 99 nautical miles, while the AIS can capture all images from as far out as 75 nautical miles. The highly sensitive and high-resolution camera is said to be capable of receiving images from as far as about 10 nautical miles in daytime and about three nautical miles at night.

Meanwhile, the surveillance equipment is already being put to use in the Lagos axis whilecomplementary coastal radar sites are said to be in the process of being replicated at Escravos, Bonny, Brass and Calabar for total and effective coverage of the nation’s coastline from Lagos as the hub.

An official of PICOMSS who pleaded anonymity said that apart from providing adequate security services, the equipment will also assist sister government agencies to function more effectively.

The Lagos base which is reportedly already being manned by PICOMSS operatives also has a functional situation room from where chief executives of relevant government agencies are to meet form time to time to appraise maritime and related security issues when occasion arises.

Earlier in Q1 2011, the Nigerian Navy completed a training program for selected officers on the new surface surveillance system, the Regional Maritime Awareness Capability (RMAC), on March 4, 2011.

The U.S. Navy-funded coastal surveillance program uses an automatic identification system and ground-based radar and sensors to enhance awareness of maritime traffic. The project is coordinated by the U.S. Department of Defense and the Department of State. The RMAC system is integrated into the Maritime Safety and Security Information System, a global database to track ships all over the world.

The [RMAC] system enables Nigerian Navy ships on patrol to be vectored to vessels of interest with precision, said Rear-Admiral J Olutoyin, presiding over the RMAC graduation ceremony.

The graduation ceremony at the Western Naval Command Regional Maritime Awareness Capability Center (WNC-RMAC) in Apapa, was also attended by a representative of the Fleet Commander (West), Commander MB Ajibade, the Fleet Operations Officer, Commander JD Michika, Captain J. Muktar and Commander A. Mohammed, Nigerian Maritime Administration & Safety Agency (NIMASA), graduating officers, and a representative of the U.S. Consulate-General in Lagos, Kris Arvind.

Speaking to the graduates and members of the Nigerian Press, Olutoyin, also stated, “I will like to thank the government of our partner nation, the United States of America, as well as the U.S. Embassy and the Office of the Security Cooperation here in Nigeria for their interest, support, and unrelenting efforts [in] making the establishment and continuous operation of this RMAC Centre possible. It is our fervent desire that this collaborative effort [will] continue and that, in [the] future, other RMAC centers will become fully operational.”

During the event, Kris Arvind, a U.S. government representative, toured the facility and witnessed real-time feeds of the RMAC system and watched live-feeds of all registered ships and suspect vessels in the Gulf of Guinea. Arvind also interacted with the graduates and participated in the graduation ceremony.

The U.S. Navy has previously installed the RMAC system in Bonny in the Niger Delta(on the eastern maritime flank of Nigeria) and in Sao Tome and Principe.

The system in Nigeria will assist Navy authorities in enforcing maritime governance and preventing illegal activities within the country’s maritime domain.

As reported earlier by U.S. Africa Command, installation of the coastal surveillance system is coordinated in part by the African Partnership Station, a U.S. Navy program to enhance maritime safety and security in Africa in a comprehensive and collaborative manner, focusing first on the Gulf of Guinea.

The mission responds to specific African requests for assistance, and is aligned with the broad international community in a concerted interagency and multinational effort to promote maritime governance around Africa.

The goal of the Africa Partnership Station is that West and Central African coastal nations become self-sufficient in maritime safety and security and are able to stop illegal activities, protect natural resources, and foster safety at sea, leading to greater prosperity and stability in the region.

The closely-allied Total Radar Coverage of Nigeria(TRACON) Project, which is geared towards the total radar coverage of the nation’s airspace and which features a network of primary and secondary sites dotted across the country, attained completion in 2010.

With additional information from:

“NATIONAL COMPASS” newspaper and the US CONSULATE-GENERAL, LAGOS.

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About beegeagle

BEEG EAGLE -perspectives of an opinionated Nigerian male with a keen interest in Geopolitics, Defence and Strategic Studies
This entry was posted in AFRICA, AFRICAN ARMED FORCES, ARMED CONFLICT, BORDER SECURITY, DEFENCE INDUSTRIES & PRODUCTION, GLOBAL DEFENCE NEWS, GULF OF GUINEA, INFRASTRUCTURE, MARITIME SAFETY AND SECURITY, MILITARY HARDWARE, NIGERIA, NIGERIAN AIR FORCE, NIGERIAN ARMED FORCES, NIGERIAN ARMY, NIGERIAN MILITARY HISTORY, NIGERIAN NAVY, PIRACY, RISK ANALYSIS, SECURITY ISSUES AND CONCERNS, WEST AFRICAN STANDBY FORCE and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to NIGERIA’S PICOMSS, US AFRICOM COLLABORATE ON COASTAL RADAR AND MONITORING SYSTEM

  1. BODE-ALAAKA OLAYINKA says:

    RMAC, Alfa jets, and the Airforces ATRs will go a long way in enhancing Detection, Tracking and Engament of illegal seacrafts in our EEZ. I wont want to be a pirate in the Gulf of Benin when the much talked about helicopter carrier arrives (with a complement of Eurocopter) arrives. Pirates had better looked for legit biz to do!

    • beegeagle says:

      We do not yet know the status of the said transaction for which President Sarkozy of France gave approval two years ago. That was supposed to deliver four large patrol craft, thirty river gunboats and a squadron of twelve Eurocopter AS-550 Fennec naval helicopters.

      The menace of piracy and the fallouts of insurgency in the Niger Delta and Gulf of Guinea will not abate unless and until it is made too daunting for perpetrators to contemplate.

      The ATR-42MPA Surveyor, Seastar UAVs, one of the new satellites launched three months ago which has security applications(NigeriaSatX), the PICOMSS-RMAC coastal radar stations and the completed Total Radar Coverage of Nigeria project are all right steps which on paper have us able to maintain effective surveillance over our vast territorial space and far and wide across our continent. They just need to coordinate tightly…no slack.

      The combination of border-facing primary and secondary radar sites of TRACON are able to monitor air traffic as far out as 300-500kms away – in effect, deep into Cameroon, Chad, Niger and as far west as northern Ghana while the satellite makes all of the foregoing appear like comparing kindergarten to graduate school really. An even more capable satellite is reportedly under construction as we write this.

      Let me restate that our security problems are not going to disappear overnight. The sooner we got ourselves on the proper footing for major counterinsurgency and anti-piracy operations, the better for us all. The madhatters everywhere are NOT going to repent overnight UNLESS they get stampeded into thinking along those lines. It is as straightforward as that.

      So we say release the purse strings and let the procurement binge begin. Nigeria’s money needs to be spent now for the protection and security of Nigerians. We are drifting ever closer to the precipice and it appears as if it is only the Lords of the Manor who do not yet realise this fact,starkly laid out as it is.

  2. BODE-ALAAKA OLAYINKA says:

    Beageagle, Ive not heard much about the Isreal supplied Seastar Unmanned sea Vehicles acquired by the Navy some years ago. Are they still operational?

    • beegeagle says:

      Yes, they are albeit covertly so. Expectedly.

      Other Gulf of Guinea states which operate some of those Israeli-made systems include Equato-Guinea and Angola. Ditto Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa.

      The prototype of the aerial surveillance system – AMEBO 1 which was manufactured by the Nigerian Air Force Institute of Technology has just completed trials and has received the all-clear.

      • John says:

        Hi beegeagle, I am the biggest fan of this blog and am loving it. I start my days with a peep. i’m excited about the Amebo 1. I would love to know whats new about it.

        John

      • beegeagle says:

        What more can I tell you that you do not already know? Well, the Amebo-1 is a project masterminded by a crop of Air Force engineers trained in robotics at Cranfield Tech in the UK.

        The project is at the protoype phase at this point and is the brainchild of the Air Force Institute of Technology(AFIT)

        Thanks for the words of encouragement, John

  3. lawal says:

    i will like to join the rmac, which step do i follow to join

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