NIGERIA’S NEW 24 METRE OCEA(FRANCE) FPB 72 MK.II PATROL CRAFT COULD BE TASKED WITH COUNTERPIRACY/ANTI-BUNKERING INTERDICTION ROLES

The layout of the aft deck and that telling SBS-type RHIB for commando raids, strongly reminiscent of the stealth Sea Eagle Mk.II Offshore Patrol Craft, are both indicative of this possibility.

The Nigerian Navy shall also be taking delivery of two 17 metre KND Littoral Interceptors and a 32 metre OCEA FPB 98 Mk.II patrol craft while a second Made-in-Nigeria 31m vessel is under construction.

In 2012, the resurgent Navy signed contracts for or took delivery of a 3,250 ton ex-USCG ship, two stealth 1,800 ton corvette-OPVs (believed to be the Chinese Type 056), three 24 metre Shaldag Fast Patrol Craft, three 24 metre OCEA FPB 72 Mk.II patrol craft, a Made-in-Nigeria 31 metre patrol craft, six 17 metre Manta Mk.II ASD Littoral Interceptors and four helicopters.

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About beegeagle

BEEG EAGLE -perspectives of an opinionated Nigerian male with a keen interest in Geopolitics, Defence and Strategic Studies
This entry was posted in BORDER SECURITY, BUNKERING, COUNTERINSURGENCY OPERATIONS, DEFENCE INDUSTRIES & PRODUCTION, GLOBAL DEFENCE NEWS, GULF OF GUINEA, JOINT(MILITARY)TASK FORCE IN THE NIGER DELTA, MARITIME SAFETY AND SECURITY, MILITARY HARDWARE, MILITARY PHOTOS, NIGER DELTA CONFLICT, NIGERIA, NIGERIAN ARMED FORCES, NIGERIAN MILITARY HISTORY, NIGERIAN SPECIAL FORCES, OIL & GAS, PIRACY, RISK ANALYSIS, WEST AFRICAN STANDBY FORCE and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to NIGERIA’S NEW 24 METRE OCEA(FRANCE) FPB 72 MK.II PATROL CRAFT COULD BE TASKED WITH COUNTERPIRACY/ANTI-BUNKERING INTERDICTION ROLES

  1. Solorex says:

    Are the Pipavav OPVs for Nigerian Navy?

  2. Spirit says:

    Its for a “West African customer” which (recent history has shown) is a way of paraphrasing Nigeria.

  3. jimmy says:

    Anytime we see West African customer since Ghana is transparent AND Lord knows why our ARMED FORCES HAS THIS COLD WAR DOCTRINE it is Nigerian. I will even go further if it says AFRICAN client look deeper . The “secrecy” I guess is to make some folks at the MOD believe they have done a good job, that no computers exists, no un records on transactions exists either.

  4. beegeagle says:

    I look forward to seeing six new BIG ships entering NN service by end-2015. As for used ships, we have placed a request for the NNS Thunder’s sister ship, USCGC Jarvis.

    They should try to get a pair of used but fully armed Type 53H2 frigates from China.The Chinese PLAN are declaring many of those surplus to requirement and transferring them to Coast Guard service as they induct brand new Type 54 frigates and Type 52 destroyers.

    The Bangladeshis have placed an order for a new F22P frigate and have also reached out for two surplus Type 53H2 frigates at knocked down prices. The Burmese also snapped up two used and older Type 53H1 frigates.

    Last August, China offered to help us with hardware for our navy. We should ask them what they have on offer and keep waiting for the opportunity to grab ‘ideal goods’ which never presents itself. They are also very generous with favourable credit. If we can get a brand new Type 54 frigate @US$230m and two used Type 53H2 which are able to soldier on for another fifteen years@US$70m, that would be cool.

    Each of those would then go to the respective fleet commands. Lemme try and post a photo of a Thai Navy Type 53H2 frigate on a visit to Hong Kong.

    From the UK, that same Bangladesh whose maritime security challenges are not nearly as serious as ours, grabbed six used 1,200 ton Island Class OPVs and a pair of used 1,830 Castle Class OPVs. We were apparently asleep when they did. Imagine what those eight vessels plus NNS Thunder would have been able to accomplish for us in terms of deepsea patrols to our 200nm EEZ limits?

    In effect, the new ships which we crave have yet to materialise while the used one which would serve as effect stop-gap acquisitions in the medium-term, we have foregone as well. As we speak, the four 1,041 ton Cat class ships which we got from the US Coast Guard, a decade down the line and despite the fact of being twice as old as the Island and Castle classes of OPVs now serving Bangladesh well, remain the reliable workhorses of our Navy. So why did we not grab ANY of the said Island and Castle classes of used OPVs?

    Well, we do need to WAKE UP and quit the dulling.

  5. beegeagle says:

    HTMS Naresuan, a Chinese-built Type 53H2 frigate of the Royal Thai Navy seen here in Hong Kong

    The Burmese Type 53s are 2,000 ton ships armed with four anti-ship missiles, two 100mm guns, and lots of depth charges. Bangladesh are getting two Type 53H2 frigates were built in the early 1990s and carry eight anti-ship missiles. A total of fifty three of the older Type 53H1(1980s vintage) and Type 53H2 frigates. The design was inspired by the Soviet Riga class frigates, which China developed from the original 1,400 ton design to a missile-carrying 2,000-2,500 ton warship equipped with modern
    electronics.

    The Thai Navy are right now upgrading the fire controls of the Type 53H2 frigates with help from SAAB. Egypt also operate the 1980s vintage Type 53H1 frigates.

    The latest export-only variant of the Type 53 frigate is the Type 53H3 variant, better known as the F22. Pakistan were the first customers for those well-armed ships, closing a US$750 million deal for four units and four embarked Harbin Z-9EC ASW helicopters. All of those delivered, the Pakistanis are reaching out for an additional four F22 frigates.

    Bangladesh have one brand-new F22P frigate on order to complement the used 1990s vintage Type 53H2 frigates acquired at bargain prices from China which feature 100mm guns, depth charges, a flight deck and eight AShMs. Burma for her part got the earlier 1980s which carry 100mm guns, depth charges and four AShMs.

    The point to note is that the C802 and C803 SSMs on board are noted for being near-inescapable with a kill ratio in excess of 97% and an imperious range of 200-280km.

    We need to stop obsessing over anyone’s goods. If the Egyptians, Thais and Pakistanis with all their exposure to western-manufactured ships find them to be worthy of induction, we should toe the line even of for the force multiplier effect.

    It should be noted that after the Type 53H2 frigates were acquired, the Thais still took on a pair of Chinese-built 1,440 ton missile OPVs complete with flight decks. Those have already seen action offshore Somalia with the international anti-piracy task force.

    The Chinese themselves have deployed Type 054 frigates and Type 052 destroyers for that mission. The ships went to Somalia and returned to China successfully. Their OPVs and embarked Harbin Z-9EC helios are right now patrolling the disputed Diaoyu Islands on the frontier with Japan while reconfigured ex-PLAN Navy Type 53 frigates(now Coast Guard ships) and new Type 056 corvette-OPVs are patrolling the disputed South China sea.

    Pakistan, having first inducted Type 53H1 frigates, have come back for more – this time, F22 frigates.

    The reason why navies go empty-handed is that they obsess over what are sometimes overhyped goods which are needlessly overpriced.

    The Indians are also on the cusp of decommissioning some 1990s era Sukanya OPVs – one of which is Sri Lanka’s flagship and which undertook deep sea interdictions and sinkings of Sea Tiger supply ships, sometimes as far out to sea as 1,700km.

    The NN say they need twenty OPVs to be good to go. Not to mention light frigates and LPDs. If we can grab a pair of used Type 53H2 frigates, USCGC Jarvis and two Sukanya OPVs by 2015, to add to a haul of fifteen new OPVs, LPDs and light frigates by 2019 when the Navy’s 10-year Strategic Acquisition Plan is slated to wind down, not to mention the subs,that would be GREAT.

    Let’s get on with it, abeg. “Na morning be monkey playtime” “e wan dance, e wan dance..music finish”

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