NIGERIAN NAVY REGIONAL MARITIME AWARENESS RADAR NETWORK LOCATE AN ALLEGEDLY HIJACKED TANKER IN GHANAIAN WATERS AFTER A 4-DAY SEARCH IN THE GULF OF GUINEA INVOLVING 3 NIGERIAN PATROL SHIPS….ALERT GHANA’S NAVY

DAILY TRUST
31 January, 2014

The Nigerian Navy has intercepted a
Greek owned merchant tanker, MT
KERALA allegedly hijacked off the coast of Luanda after a four day search in the Gulf of Guinea. The ship was intercepted with the use Nigerian Navy’s remote surveillance
system and search patrols. MT KERALA is currently under Ghanaian custody in the Port of Tema and Interpol operatives are investigating the circumstances of the hijack of the ship, a statement by Navy spokesman Commodore Aliyu Kabiru said.

He explained that, “On 23 January 2014, the Nigerian Navy received a report from the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) that MT KERALA had been hijacked off Luanda in Angola. Subsequent reports from IMB on 25 Jan 14 located her about 50nm south west of Pennington Oil Terminal in Nigeria.”

Commodore Aliyu said three Navy patrol vessels were deployed to search for MT KERALA. Two other vessels, MT ITRI and a tug boat GARE were reportedly in the vicinity of MT KERALA conducting ship-to-ship transfer of products with KERALA in gross violation of existing regulations
in Nigeria.

He explained that in a twist of events,
the ship owners, who were initially
cooperating, later refused to divulge
information as requested by the
Nigerian Navy towards locating the ship.

Likewise, the Angolan Navy in a public notification on 26 Jan 14, contended that the ship was not hijacked.Rather, it was an internal conspiracy and dispute among the crew and the ship-owners. ”

On 28 Jan 14, however, the NN was
able to locate MT KERALA in the vicinity of Tema Port in Ghana through the use of its remote surveillance system. Ghana Navy was subsequently notified to intercept via the existing common information sharing mechanism,” Commodore Aliyu noted.

He warned that the conduct of illegal
ship-to ship transfer, if proven
constitutes a violation of existing
regulations in Nigeria.

About beegeagle

BEEG EAGLE -perspectives of an opinionated Nigerian male with a keen interest in Geopolitics, Defence and Strategic Studies
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to NIGERIAN NAVY REGIONAL MARITIME AWARENESS RADAR NETWORK LOCATE AN ALLEGEDLY HIJACKED TANKER IN GHANAIAN WATERS AFTER A 4-DAY SEARCH IN THE GULF OF GUINEA INVOLVING 3 NIGERIAN PATROL SHIPS….ALERT GHANA’S NAVY

  1. drag_on says:

    This is what happens when you have Assets,Capacity and Capability. Jobs get done. Things work in their proper order and chaos is eliminated. I hope we have a policy in place to maintain what we have and grow upon it. Well done again to the Nigerian Navy and Security Services.

  2. Are James says:

    The Nigerian Navy has become a Navy. This is the way to go.

  3. beegeagle says:

    Indeed.

    What this means is that the coastal radar stations and the allied regional MACC are working the way they should. We only need more oceangoing ships and Shaldag FPCs.

    We should try and get a used German F122A frigate and six Shaldag FPCs this year 2014 (would cost about US$100m in all) and then, place an order for two more Made-in-Nigeria 38m patrol craft plus three Type 056 light frigates come 2015.

  4. asorockweb says:

    This report does show greater situational awareness and coordination by the navy.
    But there are gaps in the story.
    “Two other vessels, MT ITRI and a tug boat GARE were reportedly in the vicinity of MT KERALA conducting ship-to-ship transfer of products ” this piece of intelligence must have come from the Pennington Oil Terminal.
    This is not a good sign. A suspect ship, with illicit cargo and/or personnel was known to be headed for Nigerian waters from a port in Angolan. Yet our navy was not able to intercept, board and search or even just “eyeball” the ship.
    The suspect ship approached and even loitered around strategic economic assets like the Pennington oil terminal, and then left Nigerian waters, crossed Benin waters, crossed Togolese waters, and was spotted just outside a port in Ghana.

    That is not how it should have been.

  5. ifiok umoeka says:

    Oga Beegz, why just one F122? Why not 2 or more?

  6. ifiok umoeka says:

    I would also think that we have enough of those 35 – 45m boats and should rather build them and equip them properly! We should pay attention to the 90m and above platforms for blue water capability hoping that those 50m+ FACM would have been converted for patrol and new FACM acquired as replacement!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s