BOTH NIGERIAN AIR FORCE ALENIA ATR 42-500 MPA SURVEYOR PLANES NOW ELINT-COMPLIANT

NAF 930

NAF 931

PHOTO CREDIT: GERRY RUDMAN

http://www.egphotos.co.uk/bigimage.php?image_id=6503

Photographs show NAF 930 and NAF 931 (ATR 42-500MPA Surveyor planes) which have become even more advanced Special Mission Aircraft as
can be gleaned from the photographs after they underwent ELINT upgrades.Note the domes on the fuselage just
behind the wings.

The now ELINT-compliant Surveyor planes can thus undertake the gathering of military or other intelligence through the monitoring of electronic signals such as satellite transmissions, rocket telemetry and radar emissions while themselves being difficult to detect.

With those upgrades completed during Q4 2013, the Nigerian Air Force now possess the most advanced aerial surveillance platforms in sub-Saharan Africa.

At this time, only Nigeria, South Africa and Angola possess any ELINT capabilities across the said region .

BACKGROUNDER

https://beegeagle.wordpress.com/2013/12/03/nigerian-air-force-alenia-atr-42-500-mpa-surveyor-naf-931-now-a-more-advanced-special-mission-aircraft-undergoes-elint-upgrade-world-exclusive-photo/

BEEGEAGLE’S BLOG – say what we mean, mean what we say.

About beegeagle

BEEG EAGLE -perspectives of an opinionated Nigerian male with a keen interest in Geopolitics, Defence and Strategic Studies
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48 Responses to BOTH NIGERIAN AIR FORCE ALENIA ATR 42-500 MPA SURVEYOR PLANES NOW ELINT-COMPLIANT

  1. peccavi says:

    Oya now lets start using them. BH has to be using Satphones or other forms of wireless comms, lets start putting these assets to use

  2. doziex says:

    Yeah, and these 2 ELINT platforms, shouldn’t be serving as VIP jets for military officials.

    Instead, more solely transport platforms should be purchased.

  3. startrek says:

    Yoga wat cos U to suggest they are being used as VIP trans.?

  4. Obix says:

    @startrek, one of the planes conveyed the Air and Army chiefs to the NE during their visit to the troops. I hope it was just an isolated case. But we know that the planes are active in the operations against BH!

  5. startrek says:

    if u do know that the planes are Op active.. then must know that they were on that plane for strategic observation and not some executive joy ride

  6. gbash10 says:

    @ Obix and Startrek,I beg i no fit laugh but u are saying the truth.Now that we have an advanced ISR(Intelligence,Surveillance and Reconnaissance) capability in the form of ELINT/SIGINT capability,we can carry out surveilance of the radio-frequency spectrum,but we still lack 2 major capability gaps in the ISR,these are:
    *AWACS/AEW & C system which comprises radar/passive surveillance of airspace,and
    * JSTARS/GMTI system which carries out surveillance of surface force movements.
    So MoD Abuja,Defence HQs,and NAF HQs please take note to cover these gaps!

    • beegeagle says:

      Yeah..Nigerians are waiting for an unlikely US$600 million US-made AWACS whereas we have a usable US$70 million ZDK-03 Karakoram Eagle AWACS which Pakistan rate higher than their SAAB Erieye. The PAF operate both typesn

      One reason why we often go empty-handed is because there are many of us who have been brain-washed into thinking that Sino-Russian options don’t measure up.

      In the end we go lusting after the unattainable while the gettable eludes us infinitely. We are empty-handed by choice and not as a matter of factors beyond our control.

    • Are James says:

      Cheap AWACs platforms are easy to acquire. But JSTARS ke?.
      Where are we going to bet that from… the US?. Ain’t gonna happen. What we need now is using locally available manpower to get the ELINT planes fully capable in terms of doing actual exercises involving radar signal collection, analysis, electronic warfare, secure communications, integration with existing GSM monitoring ground equipment.

  7. peccavi says:

    Wetin una wan carry AWACs do? Do we even have ground based radar or more importantly the actual fighters to vector onto targets?

    • gbash10 says:

      @Peccavi,you want all the fighter squadrons to be on ground before we acquire AWACS?Even if we order for the fighters and AWACS,it will take up to 2-3 years before they will be delivered,within that time frame,NAF personnels would be training overseas on how to use those platforms efficiently.Or do you prefer the fire-brigade approach?
      By the way,you are serving with the UK military,you tend to be bias whenever we mention that Nigeria should acquire a particular capability!We no be una messenger or boy again,our Jaguar jets still dey storage,just mind your business because you are one of them. Abi we pee 4 una bed? Walai hold your British peace abeg!

      • triggah says:

        Gbash10 your words are harsh and ill-thought. What sir Peccavi has Said is the total truth, what do you want to do with an AWAC or AEW airplane when you don’t even have sufficient squadrons of air defence aircraft to work with.

  8. Solorex says:

    Its good news, but electronic Intelligence :telemetry and Digital Signal processing( crypt-analysis) ability is a big deal only if C4SIR integration is deep in a military. ELINT goodies is also not fully available except you have other Aircrafts/Ships/Ground forces that possess ability to share and use the intelligence.Its a thing you do for the whole military to have a good meaning. This may be the beginning of the standardization process of integration practice in the military.

  9. startrek says:

    unknown to us here Nigeria already have very similar military network to that of the US its just not so extensive yet… the major set back is lack of system operators, programmers & analysts within the urgent time needed in that field…

    • peccavi says:

      At the point of building/ buying it did no one figure out people were needed to run and maintain it.
      When I talk people dey complain say I be naysayer or contrarian.
      Aren’t these basic common sense things?

    • Are James says:

      There was some considerable effort about five years ago directed at developing a locally invented secure communications, command and control system (the name was alphanumeric and I can’t remember it now).
      A civilian of Eastern Nigerian extraction was apparently leading the project doing some extensive R&D work and everything was uncharacteristically well funded and supported then… up to the national assembly budget committee levels.
      Any ideas what became of that project?.

  10. gbash10 says:

    @Peccavi,what is your actual problem?

  11. Solorex says:

    My Guess is that the process has started in a mild way- ELINT on the maritime Surveillance platforms must necessarily mean the planes can spot bunkerers ( any ship) without any visuals and direct Navy ships/helicopter on appropriate intercept vector. It can also eave drop on standard ship borne radio communications to know what pirates are saying to who. I am sure these basics will be inclusive in the package. I am inclined to believe our ELINT is not for things like cruise missile mid course correction,continuous target spotting, breaking military class encoded communications ,warning ships of impending attacks or strikes or coordinating Anti-shipping warfare. We don’t have cruise missiles (ASM),nether do we have any dedicated platforms for Anti-shipping warfare.

    • tim says:

      The aspide used on NNS Aradu can be used as a crusie missile………the vision of nigerian military in the 80’s is staggering….I wonder what is happening to the present red necks now……….maybe we now suffering from my God father helped me enter NDA, and I can’t write a complete sentence!!!

    • triggah says:

      My thoughts exactly!

  12. gbash10 says:

    @ Tim,the Italian-built Aspide on the NNS Aradu is for air defence while the French-built Exocet is a sea skimming anti-ship cruise missile in her inventory.Just that they have bad fuse on the warhead,recall the Falkland/Malvina war of April 1982 between the Britain and Argentina.If not for the bad fuse on the Exocet missiles fired by Argentine Super Etendard supersonic jets,they could have sunk more Royal Navy warships than what they actual got.
    Ours too would need a comprehensive upgradation.

    • asorockweb says:

      Oga gbash10,

      During the Falkland war, the unexploded ordinance were bombs dropped by the Argentine Air Force.

      The problem was that they had to fly low to avoid British SAMs, that meant that when they dropped theirs bombs, the bomb didn’t have enough air-time to arm itself.

      The Argentine Navy Air Force corrected for the shorter air-time, the Air Force didn’t.

      And yes, if all the bombs that stuck home actually exploded, the Royal Navy would have been screwed, and Doziex wouldn’t be able to pimp them as PMCs.

      • doziex says:

        Hehe he…….. Omo wan yab.

        Anyway, speaking of the brits and PMC services, they would use them when the need arises.
        Though it’s still not as prevalent as in the US armed forces.

        During the Olympic games in London, the british government hired a former New york police Chief.
        See they needed to soak up all the post 9/11 security measures new York has undergone,
        and to apply what is necessary to their circumstances.

        The brits, through Isaf also made up for the short fall in EU helicopters, by recruiting mi-17s and Mi-26s pilots and choppers from ex soviet states, and farther afield.

        I truly expected that Nigerian military analysts on this blog would rise to the occasion here,
        and showcase themselves as objective military analysts, not a bunch of ” Nigeria needs no help” jingoists.

        I haven’t given up though.

        I am still challenging all beegeagle’s bloggers to do your research. You have google and you tube at your disposal.

        Update yourselves on this rapidly growing phenomenom that is privatized/professional military services.

        I am really not interested in Yabs or jingoistic rhetoric.

        Cause If I am right, and you guys are wrong, the damage you would have inflicted on Nigeria through this blog would be truly incalculable.

  13. peccavi says:

    Oga gbash10: I really laugh whenever I see the lazy comments about my British links. If you cvan point to any post where I have advocated British equipment, or doing things ‘the British way’ or even sung Britains praises abeg let me know.
    I have advocated use of the AK variant as the best assault rifle, the Miseries of helicopters for medium and heavy lift.
    My take on COIN is based on British doctrine and South African, Rhodesian and Portugese experience.
    SO abeg let me know when and where my Britishness has affected my comments.
    Please do not misconstrue my comments, I am extremely proud of my British links and my time in the British military and rate this as the finest fighting force in NATO, but that is that.
    My principle for Nigeria has always been extremely simple.
    Define the problem
    Identify a series of solutions
    Pick the solution that suits our budget, environment, technical and material abilities.

    So lets talk about AWACS.
    What are they actually used for?
    Why do we need them? Let me guess because Pakistan, the US, Russia and India have them, thus we must have them?
    Or maybe they are airborne command and control systems used in tandem with ground based systems to direct aircraft operations.
    So the first thing is to develop ground based systems.
    And then the aircraft to actually use these systems
    And then if we need an AWAC capability then we can look at that.
    But we dont
    We need ground based radars for both civil and military use.
    That should be the focus and not AWACS
    But I giess thats just British propaganda so I can get you to buy Challenger tanks and Eurofighters.
    Abeg make I hear word

    • doziex says:

      UK the best fighting force within nato ??

      AH !! The US, the French and the Turks would beg to differ.

      What Nigeria needs is a change in our mentality.

      We need and deserve anything that exists in the british arsenal and more.

      Oga peccavi’s advice for Nigeria, is ” Cut your coat according to your size and needs”

      Well Buddy, I put it to you, that that is not sound advice for Nigeria.

      This is because, Nigeria has been a nation of underachievement, and wasted potential.

      The correct approach in my estimation, is to challenge Nigeria and Nigerians to reach for the stars.

      In my estimation, there is no reason Nigeria should be any less militarily and politically ambitious than say turkey or Pakistan.

      Nigerians are known to bow to nobody. However,this can be a double edged sword.

      Pros: This self confidence, gives us the audacity to reach for the stars, seek a permanent seat in the security counsel, develop a space program etc.

      Cons: We tend to become ARROGANT, thinking we can reinvent the wheel.
      It is all well to aspire to be great, but one has to have the humility to learn and practice the fundamental building blocks that are a prerequisite for greatness.

  14. peccavi says:

    Oga Doziex I would (as expected) beg to differ

    The constant refrain of lets buy X, lets hire Y to solve a problem that we have not yet identified, in order to produce a solution we do not yet understand is more problematic to Nigeria than a failure to admire PMC’s and SU-27s

    The best way to illustrate this is by asking do you prefer an bolt action rifle or automatic rifle?

    • doziex says:

      ???
      Is that a trick questions ? Well, I grew up on comics that featured bolt action rifles, but as the german sturmgewehr proved in WW2, assault rifles are in a different class of combat lethality.

      On the PMC issue, I think our fundamental misunderstanding is that you guys see PMCs as a White man’s solution to a Black problem.

      I see the PMC for the NA, as the after school lessons we all attended in order to pass JAMB. or WAEC.

      Though we all attended high school, the after school lessons made those involved better prepared for the standardized exams.

      Training and mentorship by US special forces on one hand, and US/EU funded PMCs on the other is doing wonders for the quality of UPDF troops

      In Somalia, the PMC has been quietly mentoring Amisom soldiers and turned their units into crack urban combat capable units.

      A week or so ago, someone posted footage of UPDF troops in a convoy of MRAPs that ran into an al shabab IED.

      The footage also captured an Amisom PMC mentor in his advisory role.

      In CAR, we see the flip side. President Obama has sent upwards of 150 green berets, to train and advise the UPDF in their heliborne and jungle patrol seach to capture or kill joseph kony.

      The Ugandans are assimilating all this assistance with humility, and eagerness to learn and improve.

      However, both programs could be stopped on a dime, If the gay lobby pressures Obama.

      NA however, could pay outta pocket for any private services it needs.

      • asorockweb says:

        Doziex,

        You should clarify your position.

        We already know you believe Nigerians are proud under-achievers, and that PMCs are the solution to this problem.

        I believe that’s a summary of your position.

        The following are the PMC scenarios, please clearly indicate which ones you actually want implemented.

        1) PMCs, advising from offshore (Not in-country)
        2) PMCs training military personnel in-country
        3) PMCs advising in-country, from Army HQ to company level, but never in combat zones
        4) PMCs advising in-country, from Army HQ to company level, and going into combat.
        5) Combat formations lead by PMCs
        6) Combat formations made-up of PMCs

        If I missed any scenario, please let me know.

      • peccavi says:

        Of course its a trick question.
        The actual is answer is what am I being asked to do?
        A bolt action rifle might be useful if for example you are a sniper and wish to control how a round is ejected, an automatic weapon is useful in an assault role etc.

        And that is the crux of the matter.

        Your analogy of after school lesson is apt.
        My parents sent me there to learn book, I spent my time smoking, drinking, playing chess and embarrassing myself in front of girls.
        So in my parents eyes, they had the ‘political will’ and means to ensure my success.
        In my eyes it was a way to catch fun
        So if the entire exam passing strategy relied on lesson I was guaranteed a massive F9. If however prior to lesson, I studied the whole day, read at night, used old question papers etc then I had a chance of solving the problem lesson or no lesson.
        For some people lesson was the difference between F9 and P8 or A1 or A2. It all depended how you used it.
        At the end of the day it all boils down to what do you want to achieve?
        If you think a PMC is like lesson then is it lesson that will take us from the brink of failure or lesson that will take us from mild success to wild success.
        And if it is the latter then why is PMC the answer?
        Nigeria by now has enough combat experience and training to be a centre of excellence but the leadership is lacking to internalise the lessons learnt and take the tough decisions.
        SO if you want to argue for PMC’s maybe because you want to learn a particular technique or tactic, fine, as long as it supports the main effort. But if the idea is bring in PMC’s and they will work magic then you are wrong, they will deliver training, collect their money and go. These new shiny trained soldiers will not buy Hesco or arrest the people stealing their pensions

      • doziex says:

        Oga Asoroweb,
        Thanks for clarifying the available choices.

        I would definitely prefer option #4

        Capable PMCs in country from HQ to company level.

        They should act as trainers and advisors in the mold of US military advisors, who for instance accompany Filipino and Colombian units into battle, but don’t participate in any offensive roles.

        They would discus strategy with commanders, and even when in battle, would never issue direct orders to any NA troops.

        We don’t want anybody interrupting NA’s chain of command.

        The advisers would be very few in number.

        We could agree in the contract for them to point out flaws in the NA. Or since we already know most of the flaws, we could specifically task them in it’s fixing.

        Par example, If Oga peccavi, a former ROYAL MARINE ENGINEER was now a PMC, he could advise NA in the area’s of fortification building, and FORCE PROTECTION.

        He would be dealing with NA military engineers, sharing combat experience from Iraq and Afghanistan, and the best of royal marine doctrine.

        Soldier to soldier not from no text book.

        Imagine a very experienced MI-24 pilot like Colonel Neal Ellis formerly of EO. With Combat experience in the SADF wars, then EO in angola, EO in SLR and lately in Afghanistan, mentoring our young freshly trained mi-35 pilots.

        He knows all the tricks of the trade, and a chance to impart that sort of knowledge into the young NAF chaps would be priceless.
        He could even ride along as one of the tandem needed to fly the MI-35.

        In a perfect world, we could insist that these advisors be un armed. But in the real world, they must posses the ability to defend themselves should it come to that.

        In Vietnam, before American troops took over the war, the then Capt .Collin Powell was a military advisor to south Vietnamese troops.
        He was embedded with them, and gradually transferred US army values to the AVRN troops without any authority to issue orders.

        As we speak, US green berets are imparting daily into UPDF jungle troops, the best practices in rebel tracking.
        This is exactly what NA needs to deal with BH roaming around Nigerian territory in company and battalion sizes I might add.

        A PMC would give NA the same option, with no strings attached.

        The US govt passed a law that requires our troops posses a clean bill of health vis a vis human rights violations, before they can benefit from any training.

        That can be impossible in the real life combat zone that NA is facing, full of grey area’s, and with amnesty international accusing NA of human right abuses at every turn.

        So, I hope I have further clarified my position to you.

      • peccavi says:

        Oga I’m neither a Royal Marine nor a Royal Engineer. I studied Mechanical Engineering for my firs degree.
        I’m an Army Infantryman however I am on posting away from my parent Regiment to different Corps/ units. Just wanted to make that clear
        On a purely practical level you are right, what you describe is the best way to acquire and impart knowledge however you are essentially getting foreigners embedded in and serving in the NA.
        There are better ways to solve the problem
        You can embed Nigerians in foreign armies and bring them back to act as specialist trainers

      • doziex says:

        Oga peccavi I beg pardon my reckless promotion.

        I thought I remember a thread a few years back, where we discussed engineering, the royal engrs, and fortification building in Afghanistan.

  15. buchi says:

    to be sincere all this talk about PMCS looks like a temporary solution to to a long list of problems we have.this issue should only arise in advisory roles but not in direct combat with hostiles.i am a proud nigerian and one thing ive learnt is to build me house according to necessity that is the approach the Armed forces should adopt.my current grudge with this upgrade is the lack or non existence of a capable air defense structure.gone are the days when we had spitfires engaging the luftawaffe in dogfights in WW@.now a single 3g or4g jet armed with the proper strike package can do enormous damage to aso rock.our pitiful band of f-7s put me over the edge.Solution every air base should and must have an efficient radar detecting systems(L-band)
    SAM sites should be built as we build new hanger by the way what is happening to our missile production unit at epe island.with a proper defense system we could at least make the laughter of every member of this blog complete knowing that we’ve covered both lose ends.i stand corrected and pls oga beegz is it true that we are still using roland defense system still.

  16. buchi says:

    pls pardon me for any grammatical error

  17. freeegulf says:

    oga doziex, your PMC option of advisers down to company level, and even present in combat, is really shameful. my insides are turning just reading your comment. na wah!!
    at this stage of nation building you really think bunch of mercs are the god sent solution. u jam rock there my friend.
    like oga peccavi stated, and like i have underlined and raised endlessly, your goggles wearing, pistol strapping, knee pad wearing mercs aint gonna help with resolving pension fund, disbursement of tour of duty pay, or even stopping officers from redirecting army vehicles for personal use.

    we lack the will power full stop. and please, enough of this gen mcChristal and gen odeon. we still have sovereignty as a nation. we are no Colombia, neither are we the Philippines. so let this foreign solution rest.
    just like peccavi said, we have all the battlefield experience, what we lack, mercenaries cannot provide.

    • doziex says:

      Oga freeegulf, in all honesty, If the security situation in Nigeria continues to spiral out of control, you would have to give more sound and less emotional reasons for your disagreement.

      Your bias is leading you to describe private professionals, as ” a bunch of knee pad wearing jocks”
      You are talking about some ex spec ops americans driving mad max style a cross Iraq, providing personal security.

      I am talking about quiet professionals. As I said , research the industry, it is rapidly evolving.
      Saying we are no Colombia, or the philipines, further illustrates your bias.
      The truth is that those to militaries are as complex as NA. With longer counterinsurgency experience than Nigeria.

      As for your point that corrupt Nigerian practices would frustrate the situation, this is not always the case.
      If done respectfully, the bulk of Nigerian officers knowing the truth about NA would welcome this additional help.

      In our ist go around with MPRI.
      The whole thing was handled poorly from the start.
      The PMC was hired by the US govt in a miserly 10,000 usd contract to come and do certain assessments.
      President OBJ should have TURNED DOWN that typically condesending US govt offer of help.
      As they rubbed many NA officers the wrong way.

      See trying to teach combat experienced NA generals how to serve under civilian rule, can be open ended, and leaves plenty of room for abuse.

      Besides, the americans always offer those useless stipulations to real training as a way to cow tow to human rights activists in the US.

      When General Malu, then COAS saw that no serious training was coming from the yanks,
      An all they were doing, was waltzing about Nigeria, condescendingly looking for “untainted” NA troops to qualify for their training, He demanded that they get the fcuk out, then president OBJ had to retire him.

      So I don’t know how many of you followed that episode, which may have poisoned attitudes towards foreign advisors.

      I am however, talking about a contract between NA and a company, NA can void the contract, and throw the company out, if they are about bullshit.

      Their training and mentoring tasks has to be unambiguous, and combat related.

      Our salary structure, and internal NA corruption is our own to fix.

      • peccavi says:

        Oga Doziex: no shaking, I am not an expert of field fortifications but I studied them alot, as you can tell from my writings, force protection is one of the key planks of any army much less an army on COIN/ IS ops where there is no frontline and the enemy is all around you. Interestingly I intended to join RE but the day I went in, it was an infantryman on duty. C’est la vie.
        But back to the issue at hand

        The UK armed forces are the best in NATO man for man , lets use your selected examples and operations conducted in which they were the main or only participant

        France
        Indochina- lose
        Algeria- lose
        Rwanda- Op Turquoise- lose (the RPF took power)
        Chad/ CAR/ Congo/ Djibouti: supported governments/ rebels sometimes at the same time- confused chaos- no score
        Mali- win
        France-Wins-1 Losses-3 No score-1

        Turkey
        Cyprus- captured half the island despite it having virtually no army- lose
        Kurdistan- the PKK et al are still armed and in the field and in fact have their own country in Iraq- lose
        Turkey- Wins-0 Losses-2

        US
        Vietnam- lose
        Grenada – an island smaller than Lagos – win
        Panama- an country the size of Lekki- win
        Somalia- lose
        Iraq- US led coalition- no score
        Afghanistan- US led coalition- no score
        US Wins-1 (sorry but Panama and Grenada only get 0.5) Losses-2 No score-2

        UK
        Malaya-win
        Cyprus-win
        Falklands- win
        Oman/ Dhofar- win
        Aden- lose
        Kenya- win but maybe I’ll put that as a no score
        Sierra Leone- decisive intervention- 0.5 win
        UK-Wins-4.5 Losses-1 No score-1

        Thus by empirical measure the British armed forces are the most independently successful and thus the best in NATO
        Please feel free to contradict or contest any point raised

        PMC’s:
        The centrality of your point is correct, PMC’s can accelerate the learning process, if used properly and intelligently but Nigeria’s current problems are not a problem of expertise in particular but in general.
        Venturing tentatively into political territory, right from the top we need to see leadership, we need to see the top political leadership of this country on the same podium giving a joint press release or press conference and forming an joint security council. It doesn’t matter if the council only meets to watch TV but it is important to pass on the image of unity rather than this completely fucking stupid politicking.
        There needs to be consequences for failure. The base commander at Giwa or NAF Maiduguri should have been subjected to a board of inquiry and somebody somewhere sacked.
        Whoever released that stupid press release that those kids had been rescued should be sacked.
        In a word accountability.
        Those siphoning money for pensions, pay, medical treatment should be tried, assets seized and if I had my way shot.
        If I was the President I would host all the rescue girls at Aso Rock, pamper them and let them write their exams their and offer scholarships to them
        In other words empathy
        Once we have established that baseline of seriousness we can start looking deeper into our woes
        If our problems iswe are not understanding the conflict we are engaged in then we can undergo the necessary staff work to identify the gaps in our performance and then if it is something we can’t solve ourselves or by tapping a friendly nation then hire in PMC’s.
        But we need to have clean up the bigger issues first.
        The Malian army on paper was ‘a US trained Army’ what happened?
        MPRI trained the Croatians and they smashed the Serbs?
        What was the difference? Political will

        EO and Unita is a fascinating story but bear in mind several things, their job was not to get Savimbi but to capture a specific area. They were in essence fighting a conventional, organised, structured army. They completed their task through a combination of good tactics, and awesome fighting skill. However the capture of Savimbi took alot of other factors in Angola to come to pass. In Sierra Leone, EO took a specific area and demoralised the enemy to the point they sued for peace, but again they were fighting a different foe, an indisciplined yet centrally controlled mass rebel force that was dependant on the land for supplies.
        PMC’s have never ended a conflict. In the case of SL I would suggest this is not their fault, Albright, Blair and co take the credit for giving the RUF everything they couldn’t achieve on the battlefield.
        However when I mention SL above as British win, it was and is. Why
        Although they only undertook 2 main combat operations, they essentially went in and did what EO did. They took the fight to the enemy and overmatched them in a way they could not handle.
        However the most important thing the UK did was embed their troops and officials into the RSLAF and remake the Army from the bottom up, rooting out the uselessness and corruption that destroyed it before.
        UKSF took control of the Guinea/ SL border and fucked the smugglers
        Can you honestly give a PMC beholden to its shareholders that kind of latitude.
        If EO had been given that opportunity then I’m sure they would have done the same in terms of root and branch reforms, perhaps even better as you would have Africnas training Africans but no country on the planet unless its completely on the rocks will hand over its defence to a private entity.
        in Mali we fixate on the bombing and fighting. But they just like the Brits have embedded their troops not in the sexy stuff but in the HQ, admin, logistics and other fundamentals of the Army. The infantry training is under the EU,

        So yes there are emotional reasons not to suborn your security to foreigners or private businesses, but there are also good strategic reasons not to do the same.
        And as I hope I have listed above Nigeria’s issues are less tactical or operational and more strategic.
        This is a view echoed most people who have operated with the Nigerian Armed Forces (except the French, they always have nasty things to say!).
        So unless we are going to get a PMC to be our Minister of Defence we need to internalise first

      • freeegulf says:

        Oga doziex, I m surprised you really do not understand your country very well. let me indulge you a bit.
        how strategic is the north east? is is not the same federal govt that dash Cameroon an entire land strip. a peninsula with Nigerians, plus rich natural resources. not forgetting the strategic implication of defending Calabar in case of war. you take the fed govt too serious!
        how much does the tri northeast states bring into the federal till? the federal govt can comfortably let the far north burn and just sit down to CONTAIN the fire.

        if the insurgents do not move in force into the north west and slowly crawl towards the FCT, then this ongoing campaign will remain a political mudslinging charade.

        the northeast is no niger delta. even for the ND, it was the drastic reduction of oil flow that got the FG to sit and face the issue head on. the most BH can do, will be kill kill kill. sorry, with a population of over 160 million, the Nigerian state is not too sensitive about civilian deaths or chaos. let them bring Abuja under siege, then you would see the FG in action. but as far as they remain cornered in the NE (and unable to breakout, or effect a devastating terrorist actions in other parts of the country), this will remain a sideshow with its political trail and impasse.

        sovereignty is another serious issue. why should we have the likes of gens odeon and McChrystal lording over our general staff. if at this stage our general staff cant war game, plan scenarios, lead operational exercise, then they have no business being there in the first place.

        we are corrupt!! every single institution and parastatal is in the mud, the armed forces included. you will have to find a PMC team that should also Help us clean our act included as part of their contract. without this, all the shiny toys and Napoleonic art of strategy would go to waste on us.

        the PMCs have no new role to play, nothing emotional about that. the Colombia and Philippines you alluded to, have they been able to eradicate the thorns on their backs? even with all the US help, there are still ongoing insurgencies in these countries. most of these so called Help are overrated.

        we cant better our situation without thoroughly understanding the ache. oga peccavi hit the nail on the head. we have to INTERNALIZE. where is the morale without the salary structure and efficient disbursement? where is the efficient combat prosecution when the WILLPOWER is not even there to change anything?

        so even if you bring in the most professional and combat effective military contractors, they will be unable to impact all these their highly praised skills because the army has failed to sort out the basis. anything short of direct action and combat front deployment, the contractors are bound to fail in their Nigerian mission. you will probably need them to hold rifle, pilot aircraft and rule the country directly before they can achieve your dreams.

        its quite unfortunate, but more civilians would continue to be victims of this BH episode. its all part of war and violence

      • doziex says:

        Oga freeegulf,
        with contractors, and US advisors, Columbia has raised many world class police and military fighting units.
        Their police commandos took out Pablo Escobar, and they have a number of ranger type heliborne battalions, backed by US donated black hawk helicopters, that has brought the FARC to it’s knees, and now they are suing for peace talks.

        With PMCs, you get what you pay for.

        Nigeria’s corruption is truly destabilizing I agree. But when we hire a foreign coach to ready and guide our super eagles thru a tournament, we don’t expect that they fix all aspects of corrupt officialdom in Nigeria do we ?

      • peccavi says:

        Good analogy,
        How far did the foreign coaches take us and how well is our own, Nigerian born bred and trained coach doing?

  18. freeegulf says:

    exactly!!! how far did these foreign ‘technical advisers’ take us?
    if you think corruption is not a major destabilizing factor, then believe me you don’t know how frustrating the Nigerian working environment is.

    as for Colombia, Pablo escobar died, his Medellin cartel faded quickly. but guess what, they where quickly replaced by the Cali cartel and other low profile drug lords.
    nothing new with the Colombian army and police. they jump from US helicopters and burn jungle drug labs, meanwhile tons of labs spring up in that same Colombian jungle. FARC has been fighting for nearly 50 years, and contrary to your belief, they still have the fire to continue the insurgency. the drug business is still very on track. to put it mildly, the war on drugs has been a disaster. just another outlet for USA imperialist manoeuvre, and foreign SFs (american and british) to see action. an epic failure!

    borrowing oga peccavi’s word, INTERNALIZE, and that’s the solution. if we don’t, we might as well call for a re-colonization. only that this time, the imperial powers wouldn’t be too keen on it either. they would rather balkanize us into little bantustans than see a united strong-leading-progressive-developed black nation.

    • doziex says:

      Okay,
      So do you guys think oga CIC and co. are ready to INTERNALIZE ?
      See, corrupt or not, Nigeria needs competent units.
      Seeing that Nigerian politicians are not ready to do what is necessary any time soon,
      How can we ensure that we have competent units to keep things from unraveling ?

      This level of military incompetence, tactics and logistics wise, will lead to NA being defeated in maidugri, then what next ?

  19. freeegulf says:

    corruption is a fact of the Nigerian society. but the two fields that shouldn’t tolerate this mud dwelling corruption re the armed forces and the medical field. the stakes are too high in these fields to allow pettiness and sloppiness set in.

  20. freeegulf says:

    well, oga doziex, extra governmental ways to fix these institutions aint happening anytime soon, sorry.
    society needs to change a lot, both the leadership and the masses, for our institutions to function properly.

    a development that should interest you though, should NAF decide to heed our calls, begging and advice regarding prompt procurement of hardware and in considerable numbers, they might end up hiring foreign pilots for their helicopters. they don’t have that a large pool of aviators.
    so if the numbers do increase, they will have to get other pilots to fly these aircraft until their own pilots complete their training. its the reason they still keep buying machines in single, double and triple digits. the qualified crew re simply not there.

    NAF needs to overhaul; in Doctrine, in Training ( the flying schools need to start inducting more officers and training far greater numbers of personnel) and in the Acquisition of weaponry

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