NYANYA BOMBINGS: AMINU OGWUCHE, SUSPECTED MASTERMIND CAUGHT IN SUDAN

Storm troopers of the State Security Service keep a lid on proceedings in a conflict-ridden part of the federation

NEWS AGENCY OF NIGERIA
14 May, 2014

The International Police (Interpol) has arrested one of the two suspected masterminds of Nyanya bombings, Aminu Sadiq Ogwuche, in The Sudan.

Mr Mike Omeri, the Coordinator, National Information Centre on the Rescue of the Abducted Chibok Girls, disclosed this at a joint news conference in Abuja on Wednesday.The news conference was attended by the Department of State Service (DSS), the Nigeria Police and the military.

“One of the two most wanted suspects of the Nyanya bombings placed on terrorists list has been arrested with the effort of the Interpol.’’ He said Ogwuche’s extradition back to Nigeria would commence soon for interrogation and prosecution.

Omeri also said the operation to rescue the abducted girls was being carried out by the Nigerian troops, while others were playing complementary roles.

Marilyn Ogar, spokesperson for DSS, said Nigerians should be happy that the international community had joined the operation to free the country of terrorists. She said the mystery behind Boko Haram and the abduction of Chibok girls would soon be unravelled.

Spokesman for the police, Frank Mba, said “parading the suspects would weaken the terrorists. This will also help to demystify them. “It will also enable the security agencies to know their modus operandi.’’

The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the other suspected mastermind, Rufai Abubakar Tsiga, is yet to be apprehended.

About beegeagle

BEEG EAGLE -perspectives of an opinionated Nigerian male with a keen interest in Geopolitics, Defence and Strategic Studies
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50 Responses to NYANYA BOMBINGS: AMINU OGWUCHE, SUSPECTED MASTERMIND CAUGHT IN SUDAN

  1. WachanGuy says:

    Beautiful news to start the day. More of the same please, let’s ensure as swift an end to BH as is possible. Aluta continua!

  2. jimmy says:

    LET US BELIEVE THIS NIGHTMARE IS SLOWLY BUT SURELY COMING TO AN END

  3. Spirit says:

    Seconded 1achanGuy! Kudos to the DSS.

    This is one good news I need badly. I was beggining to think we can do anything right anymore.

    Now, the DSS have proven several times that it ican hold its own anywhere anytime. It is well able to carry out its constitutional duties.

    Questions are?

    1) Why does the DSS achieve so much where others fail? Could these successes be traced to;
    (A) Good training
    (B) Adequate incentive/motivation(
    (C) Latest gadget/equipment
    (D) Good tactics
    (E) Robust strategy
    (F) Proper recruitment/selkection

    My ogas, we have many evidences that policy makers read this blog. In fact, it is the ‘daily brief’ of a number. Of them. Can we please have some insights into what makes DSS ‘thick’ (without compromising national security) so that others can emulate?

    Let’s discuss sir.

  4. WachanGuy says:

    Related video to this situation, controversial IMO but I’m sharing for people to ponder on and draw their own conclusions. My sole allegiance lies with the Nigerian flag so no attempt at derailing any inbound help. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1mNgg8TtTM

    • peccavi says:

      Thats 32 minutes of evidence free, speculative bullshit.
      Simply saying ‘we know’ repeatedly does not mean ‘we know’ anything
      Abeg that guy is a nutjob and will apply exactly the same conspiracy theory to any situation

  5. Deway says:

    Is anyone noticing the link between boko haram, hard core northern islamists and Sudan?

    • Are James says:

      The NIA should get off their asses and do some real work for a change. This would have to start from purging their ranks of people who have more love for their religion than their country

      • asorockweb says:

        You are assuming a lot with your statement.

        How do you know who did what work?

        How do you know their ranks are filled with “religion lovers”?

        You are talking about real people here; don’t assume so much.

    • peccavi says:

      Absolutely correct.
      Like all western fixated people, I’ve been focussed on the lack of diaspora in the west keeping BH from internationalising, however there is a huge diaspora in Sudan and the Islamic world. And they are exactly the type who this nonsense appeals to.
      This guy seems to have had a privileged upbringing, went to military school and all

      • asorockweb says:

        Yea, like the “underwear bomber” or “Christmas day bomber”

        The educated and radicalized are the ones that will try to bring havoc to our cities, the idea of spending endless nights in sambisa forest doesn’t appeal to them.

  6. Adino says:

    Heard General Bandit has been removed as GOC 7th batallion.

    • Are James says:

      Heard the same.
      I think the guy should have taken on his bosses early about soldiers welfare and equipment instead of keeping quiet and now being the fall guy. However his decision asking the men to fall back from their positions at night, insisting on it against wise counsel and exposing them to that ambush provokes so many questions and it is just as well that the guy goes.
      The Provost Marshall Corps (MPs) and the DMI should immediately commence the purge of the ranks of the army of unprofessional elements. It has to be intense and bloody.as Stalin and Hitler did it successfully to their armies.
      IBB also successfully did many purges against ‘undue radicalism’ when he was Chief of Staff. The purge the NA requires now should be targeted at Ethnic Nationalism, Politicization, Islamic fundamentalism, Christian fundamentalism and Corruption.

      • Nnamdi says:

        Heheheheheeeeeee….! Yeparipa o!

        Haba, sebi fortnight ago, some people here say na only “naysayers” dey admit say serious welfare wahala dey hala our boys at front in NE, so tay one of dem here deny koro-koro say dem no be NA boys. Oya nah! chicken don come home come roost, the ogas wey una dey hype manage escape bullet an finally removed by bigger cats. I no know say people wey dey chop corned beef and sleep for aic-conditioned tent fit rebel so tey dem fire dem oga moto, nearly hit am.

        Ehn…by the way, na SR break both news o! hope them still dey (in-)credible?

        Plantain dey spoil, some people say na ripe e dey ripe.

        #Scotoma

      • Nnamdi says:

        ….and now, on the whole matter…

        As much as it is not only essential, but urgent to re-tool the national security system, it is also important to remember that fancy equipment in hands of poorly motivated troops or corrupt commanders won’t benefit the country. But in fairness, the whole sham is simply a reflection of the larger society they represent.

      • Martin Luther says:

        Na so

    • rugged7 says:

      This link is not to embellish boko haram, but for the people in MoD to do the needful for our men in uniform…

      Sahara reporters are not a very credible locus for an assessment.
      BUT, if this is truly a Nigeria army outpost, then the troops are severely under-resourced.
      And i see the same bullshit, paperweight hilux vans being used in a FOB?? The perimeter defence is atrocious.
      Something is dangerously off with equipments for the troops. It is really embarrassing and if actually 9 soldiers died, somebody’s head most role…
      MOD, DDI should take note.

      • rugged7 says:

        something’s wrong with the link….

      • rugged7 says:

        The video shows what remained of an army outpost after Boko Haram militants attacked a Nigerian army outpost in Izge a township near Gwoza. The militants arrived the area in two pick up van shot and killed nine soldiers and made away with 8 military vehicles and 200 powerful bombs. ????
        ?????Some of the bombs are long range bomb capable of traveling the distance between Suleija in Niger State and the Presidential Villa in Asokoro area of Abuja.
        -According to sahara reporters

      • Are James says:

        Wrong videos my friend.

      • tim says:

        If it were true…… Those might be 155mm munition……those would be very destructive is used as IEDs.

      • asorockweb says:

        Oga Rugged7,
        Do you have a rough idea when the attack was supposed to have taken place?

      • Deway says:

        Yes, the outpost was attacked and 9 soldiers were killed, no be joke. I counted 5 bodies. They even shot something that looks like a dog.

  7. Deway says:

    Alas, i hear the suspect is British born. Can someone confirm. No foreign media is carrying this important syory

    • igbi says:

      What the hell is going on in britain, why are they making so many terrs in there ?
      But still they make less terrs than any arab country.

  8. Are James says:

    @Nanmdi
    Patriotism comes in many ways, some of us have a continuous improvement attitude to it and others have a soft love attitude to it. I think for national security institutions at this critical time, the tough love approach is best.

    • Nnamdi says:

      Egbon mi, I recognize and respect that enough sir. I only try to make us not lose sight of some issues that have seemingly fall into our blind spots, yet equally very important.

  9. Are James says:

    @Asorockweb
    You need to read all available material in cyberspace and local news about unchecked and under reported movements of Islamic militants to and from Sudan, Yemen and Qatar. This interchange is still going on as we speak. In the DefSec space we don’t rate effort or good intentions, we judge by results; how many innocent people killed, how many girls kidnapped..et.c those are the KPIs

    • Are James says:

      There are concentric circles of domains of awareness.
      The work of the DSS has to lag the NIA, NIA is the scanner we have of the entire geo political space that is the entire world. When insurgents/enemies break that barrier, it gives more work for the DSS to do, if the DSS fails then you have the security incidents and insurgences. So the NIA needs to be revamped to give us early situational awareness.

  10. ozed says:

    @rugged 7

    I would be very shocked if a small outpost near Gwoza would have 200 155mm shells. Particularly since they obviously had no artillery in the location.

    Its loopholes like these that make Sahara reports an un-credible source at best.

    • rugged7 says:

      Oga Ozed
      I would tend to agree with u. I personally dislike sahara reporters because they are not balanced in making reports. Note my query marks on the numbers as i really found it hard to believe. Often sahara reporters will mix half truths with outright lies.
      However, the videos can not be discountenanced, as they appear to have been taken by Nigerian soldiers. Note in the video where the soldiers get orders from there O/C about management of the dead bodies.And there comments about Rest in peace for there comrades. Like oga Deway said, a dog(probably IED detecting sniffer dog) was shot… on the antero-lateral aspect either at close range or with a high calibre weapon(based on the wound dimensions)…

  11. ozed says:

    Really sad time for the Nigerian armed forces.

    Some clown in the US Senate is raising the issue that the Nigerian army is too scared to engage the BH. And so the US should consider stopping the assistance on the Chibok girls’ search since there is no assurance the Nigerian army can rescue them after the US has found them.

    Kaai we don suffer oooh! See insult from people wey no fit find Naija for map.

    • igbi says:

      Westerners, I think they confuse Nigeria with Mali.

    • igbi says:

      That sentence from the US senator is highly illogical. Who is that senator trying to protect ? If the senator thinks the military is not capable then how does that justify the stoppage of the search ? No the reason the senator wants the search to stop must be something else ! Who is the senator trying to protect ?

  12. peccavi says:

    Oga AreJames you want an intense and bloody purge?
    Abeg be careful what you wish for. A board of enquiry and court martial is enough

    • Are James says:

      I’ve had maybe twelve conversations in the last five years with US marines rotating from the US back to Iraq and A-Stan various times at airports or hotel lobbies in NC and Texas.
      The general impression you come away with about men in uniform are
      (i) general disdain for the country’s leadership, whether Bush or Obama this is usually reinforced by some interesting name calling.
      (ii) Camaraderie and love for a core team: the answer you got to the question ‘why are you going back to Iraq?’ elicited the same response, ‘for my guys, my platoon, my company, my team’ .The patriotic element ‘for my country’ usually comes after this basic love and loyalty to their core team has been expressed. So this is the atom and molecule of a military force and any leadership that destroys that basic fabric that holds its military together deserves some terrible sanctions.
      Sanctioning the leadership of the military is easy for any country’s political leadership with strong core values. Hitler and Stalin used to eat generals for breakfast. The little boy in N Korea also does not take BS from any general.
      When you see an inferior enemy running rings round the almighty NA and causing heavy casualties due to internal sabotage, corruption and breakdown of esprit de corps then abomination don dey happen and we must find out.

  13. igbi says:

    I doubt the US is really interested in helping. If it were then the anti Nigeria propaganda coming out of its news papers would have stopped by Now. My feeling is that what the US wants is a permanent US base in Nigeria, that is why they keep calling our military by every name in the book. The US is not sincere.

  14. igbi says:

    http://www.thenigerianvoice.com/news/146165/1/missing-girls-jonathan-administration-being-treat.html

    Missing Girls: ‘Jonathan administration being treated unfairly’ – British PM
    By pointblanknews.com
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    British Prime Minister, David Cameron has stated before the British Parliament that describing the Federal Government as negligent or slow to respond to rescue the over 200 missing girls in Chibok was unfair.

    He said the Jonathan administration was infact doing all it could and that the Nigerian government under Jonathan’s leadership had been investing in counter terrorism measures and training for its troops over the past few years.

    Cameron said, ‘Today I can announce we have offered Nigeria further assistance in terms of surveillance aircraft, a military team to embed with the Nigerian army in their headquarters and a team to work with United States experts to analyse information on the girls’ location.’

    ‘This was an act of pure evil. The world is coming together not just to condemn it but to do everything we can to help the Nigerians find these young girls.’

    MP Tom Clarke, a former Labour Minister and respected expert on international development asked the PM, ‘While I welcome the efforts to rescue the schoolgirls in Nigeria, will the prime minister agree that the Nigerian government hasn’t lifted a finger to protect its own citizens in the north as they were attacked by Boko Haram?’

    Cameron replied: ‘I don’t think his description of the Nigerian government is entirely fair. They do face a very vicious terrorist organisation in terms of Boko Haram.

    ‘They are investing in and training their armed forces in counter-terrorism abilities. We have worked with them on that and we are willing to do more work with them on that, particularly if we can make sure proper processes are in place for dealing with human rights issues.’

  15. Are James says:

    We are not taking any consolation prizes from the British PM. We don’t for once presume that the British set standards of performance for our FG and army.
    Our Army has fallen below our own standards in recent times, it is a temporary thing but we should correct it quickly. Too many young lives have been lost through bad decisions from leadership.
    There should be a high level board of inquiry headed by cabinet level ministers/advisers involved in national security, thankfully the new M.of.D is an old army hand. Heavy sanctions should be applied to all negligent or corrupt parties without consideration for their level on the hierarchy.

    • jimmy says:

      Fair enough
      Start with BABA IYABO HE STARTED THE BALL ROLLING before you get to the minions.
      I am being scarcastic just be careful what you wish for there are a lot of good people in these services who will become collateral damage because they don’t have the right accent/ ethnicity/ they did not follow the script, fill in the blank of their transgression.

  16. saints says:

    the US wouldnt want to waste resources and time on intelligence only for the nigerian forces to go in, execute the rescue and take the glory. i guess friend is laying the foundation for a sole US led rescue operation.

    n a testy exchange during a Senate hearing Thursday, a
    Defense Department official repeatedly told Sen. Robert
    Menendez that the U.S. government couldn’t say whether
    Nigerian forces are prepared to rescue more than 300 girls who
    were kidnapped in the country last month. The Democrat was
    not pleased with her response.
    “Here’s my problem. Here’s my problem, Friend,” an
    increasingly irritated Menendez told Alice Friend, the principal
    director for African affairs at the Defense Department. “We’re
    going to support [Nigerian forces] as much as possible. But if
    we found actionable intelligence that identified where a large
    part or all of the girls are, and we do not believe or we don’t
    know if they have the capacity to act on it, what good will that
    be?”
    Although State Department and Defense officials are now on
    the ground in Nigeria, helping gather intelligence and train
    Nigerian forces in hostage negotiations, it’s unclear whether
    the Nigerian military is capable of using any of that to act.
    Friend told Menendez at Thursday’s Senate Foreign Relations
    Committee hearing on terrorist group Boko Haram that she
    could not speculate on the Nigerian military’s readiness.
    But the Democratic senator from New Jersey pressed on.
    “It is impossible to fathom that we might actually have
    actionable intelligence and that we would not have the
    wherewithal either by the Nigerians themselves or by other
    entities helping the Nigerians to be able to conduct a rescue
    mission. And so all of this would be worthless,” Menendez
    said, instructing Friend to return to the committee with that
    information at a future date. “We’re not going to wait until we
    find out that we have actionable intelligence and then find out
    that we don’t have the capacity to do this.”
    “I’d be happy to come back to you with that information, sir,”
    Friend replied.
    “Jesus,” Menendez sighed, pulling away from the microphone.
    The situation in Nigeria, Friend admitted earlier in her testimony,
    is a mess. The military there is poorly trained, poorly equipped,
    and so afraid of an increasingly brutal Boko Haram that its
    members are reluctant and perhaps incapable of taking on the
    terrorist organization. The military had been kept for decades at
    a low level of capability, Friend said, because of fears by the
    country’s government about a possible military coup. Those
    concerns are no longer an issue in Nigeria, Friend added, but
    the weakness of the military there remains a dangerous reality.

    the US is in search of glory, and just like senator Mccain sa if the US could successfully unravel this kidnap. it would be one of the most important acheivements of the obama administration.

  17. saints says:

    the US wouldnt want to waste resources and time on intelligence only for the nigerian forces to go in, execute the rescue and take the glory. i guess friend is laying the foundation for a sole US led rescue operation.

    n a testy exchange during a Senate hearing Thursday, a
    Defense Department official repeatedly told Sen. Robert
    Menendez that the U.S. government couldn’t say whether
    Nigerian forces are prepared to rescue more than 300 girls who
    were kidnapped in the country last month. The Democrat was
    not pleased with her response.
    “Here’s my problem. Here’s my problem, Friend,” an
    increasingly irritated Menendez told Alice Friend, the principal
    director for African affairs at the Defense Department. “We’re
    going to support [Nigerian forces] as much as possible. But if
    we found actionable intelligence that identified where a large
    part or all of the girls are, and we do not believe or we don’t
    know if they have the capacity to act on it, what good will that
    be?”
    Although State Department and Defense officials are now on
    the ground in Nigeria, helping gather intelligence and train
    Nigerian forces in hostage negotiations, it’s unclear whether
    the Nigerian military is capable of using any of that to act.
    Friend told Menendez at Thursday’s Senate Foreign Relations
    Committee hearing on terrorist group Boko Haram that she
    could not speculate on the Nigerian military’s readiness.
    But the Democratic senator from New Jersey pressed on.
    “It is impossible to fathom that we might actually have
    actionable intelligence and that we would not have the
    wherewithal either by the Nigerians themselves or by other
    entities helping the Nigerians to be able to conduct a rescue
    mission. And so all of this would be worthless,” Menendez
    said, instructing Friend to return to the committee with that
    information at a future date. “We’re not going to wait until we
    find out that we have actionable intelligence and then find out
    that we don’t have the capacity to do this.”
    “I’d be happy to come back to you with that information, sir,”
    Friend replied.
    “Jesus,” Menendez sighed, pulling away from the microphone.
    The situation in Nigeria, Friend admitted earlier in her testimony,
    is a mess. The military there is poorly trained, poorly equipped,
    and so afraid of an increasingly brutal Boko Haram that its
    members are reluctant and perhaps incapable of taking on the
    terrorist organization. The military had been kept for decades at
    a low level of capability, Friend said, because of fears by the
    country’s government about a possible military coup. Those
    concerns are no longer an issue in Nigeria, Friend added, but
    the weakness of the military there remains a dangerous reality.

    the US is in search of glory, and just like senator Mccain said if the US could successfully unravel this kidnap. it would be one of the most important acheivements of the obama administration.

  18. peccavi says:

    Oga Saint, I beg to differ.
    Unless someone in the Pentagon is smoking crack, they are not going to attempt a damn thing.
    As I have said before, hostage rescue of the trickiest op you can hope to pull off and as presented before even in cases where you had all the hostages in a known controlled environment, the rescues have gone terribly wrong. The only hostage rescues in similar circumstances that have succeeded (i.e. multiple hostages in jungle/ forest situation) have been the Colombians and the Brits in Sierra Leone, and in the latter case it was less than 20 hostages all in one place and to be honest the hostage takers were a bunch of drug smoking, teenage area boys who were so fucking stupid they took a satellite phone from the Brits that tracked their movement. Yet these idiots still managed managed to kill an SF operator and injure the entire command element of 1 PARA.
    BH has more professionalism in its little finger than these clowns so we are talking about trying to rescue 300 girls broken down into smaller groups in multiple locations. They have basic operational skill and awareness and local knowledge. They are also extremely ruthless and all it takes is one burst of fire, grenade or IED to kill all of the hostages in that location.
    So look at it from the operational point of view
    The operation will have 3 phases, Find, Confirm, Plan, Shape, Fix, Neutralise, Suppress, Destroy, Extract, Exploit.
    Find: you need to identify which general geographical area the hostages are, this will be done with aerial and satellite images analysis. For the sake of argument its like identifying which part of Sambisa they are in North, east, west etc
    Locate: in this case you want to narrow down the specific area that they actually are in, for example rather than just saying they are in the NE corner of Sambisa, you can say they are in a 3km radius of Hill XYZ in the NE Corner of Sambisa again using ISTAR assets
    Confirm: in this case you want to make sure these are indeed the Chibok girls (how exactly) this can only be done by deploying recce troops to get close to the enemy. Oya now we don enter the next stage of the problem. You have to identify how you will get the troops to that location, helicopter? Noisy, Parachute/ HALO? Into a forest? Risky. Vehicle? Again risky. Most likely option would be helicopter insertion at night 15-20kms from the position and then approach on foot. Then you have to find a position to lie up until you can do the recce, has to be concealed, defensible but also have access to areas that can be used as a HLS in case of incasity. You also need to ensure you have radio comms. Bearing in mind al movement and work must be done at night. Then you have to do the close recce, identify enemy positions, numbers, mora;le, weapons, equipment, location, number and condition of hostages. Also identify potential forming up points, HLS, angles of attack, fire support positions, withdrawal positions etc. Then pass this info back
    Now all this is predisposed on a fixed enemy, if they are mobile your wahala has increased, you either need vehicles to maintain contact with them or else continuously get picked up by helicopters, potentially alerting the enemy. The other option is multiple teams are dropped with specifi areas of ops and monitor the enemy as they pass though their individual AOs.
    But then the deployed forces need certain things. They need helis to pick them up and provide fire support if they are compromised, these helis need to be near by, I would suggest that the nearest they could be is N’djamena. Basing them at Maiduguri completely blows opsec as it will be somewhat difficult to pretend Nigerian has just obtained Blackhawks and Chinooks. They also need a QRF, a platoon or Company minus of Rangers who will come get them if shit goes wrong, all these troops need basing, feeding and supplying.
    Again this is for a single fixed/ mobile enemy. What about an enemy split into multiple groups? Even an enemy split into groups in Borno is hell, split into groups over Borno, Chad, Niger, Cameroun, you need to provide all of the above for each discrete op.
    Plan: you have as much info as possible, now make a plan. You need a plan that gets all your forces in, destroys the enemy and extracts, you need the resources to extract from wherever, generally you would need choppers. For choppers you need support and maintenance staff, fuel, ammo etc.
    What happens if a chopper goes down? You need a search and rescue element. What happens if the assault troops get bogged down? You need a reserve.
    What happens if the reserve gets wiped out or bogged down? You need another combat element. How do you communicate with the girls? How do you know who is who? You need local liaison.
    How do you prevent helicopters being shot down? You need air support? Fixed wing or rotary wing? Are they guided from the ground or air?
    This is all for one, stationary target. Lets think about doing this for 3 stationary targets. You need battlespace management and possibly airborne command and control. What about 3 mobile targets, 6, 9 , 10 30? If they are mobile is it better to hit them on the move or wait till they stop? At night or during the day?
    Oya now
    Shape: you have to move all the elements into place. How do you rehearse the troops in a similar area and maintain opsec? How do you move the logistics into place without anyone noticing. You need to identify enemy locations, routes of travel, supply lines, friendly villages, water sources, fuels sources, ammo dumps etc. Identify ho are the commanders, how do they communicate, who do they communicate with?
    Fix: whether the enemy is stationary or mobile you need to make sure they remain where you want to have the correct effect on them. How? Firepower? You lose the element of surprise and could harm hostages. Psyops? Maybe but how do you identify what will have effect and how do you deliver it?
    Neutralise: what are the enemies most potent weapon systems? Their heavy weapons/ RPGs that can take out aircraft, and fire over long ranges. How do they communicate? Where is the command element located and how low down is authority delegated, thus can the local group commander operate independently, can he move as he wants or kill the hostages as he wants. All these elements need to be neutralised, how? Air strikes? Snipers? Direct assault? Electronic warfare to jam their radios or satphones? Psyops to give them fake orders?
    Suppress: time to go in, you must now suppress the enemy with fire, smoke or maybe just harsh language, whatever. The enemy must not be in a postion to use their weapons or to only do so sporadically and inaccurately as the assault goes in
    Destroy: time for the Rambo shit. Are you going in silent or noisy? If silent how do you that simultaneously? How long does it take? If noisy, is it lethal noisy or pyrotechnics? Whats the objective to secure the hostages by defeating the enemy or to secure by destroying. If its the former then all you want to do is drive them off, if the latter then you need to separate them from the hostages and then either fix or pursue and then destroy. You need a 3-1 advantage for a conventional assault, with highly trained troops maybe a 2-1 advantage will suffice.
    Again amplify that for multiple and mobile targets
    Extract: Now how do you extract 276 people? Whats the capacity of a Chinook or Blackhawk (55/ 11 passengers)? How many trips will be needed? Chinnok has less range than a Blackhawk, so do you use 6 chinooks or 2 Chinooks 3 time or 1 6 times? Where do you fly them to? Or 30 Blackhawks? This is just for the hostages. What about friendly forces and any prisoners. Maybe you use Nigerian Mi 8s? Then you need to tie in tactics and procedures, you need compatible radios, you need to isolate the crews and the aircraft to maintain opsec. Ok so rather than flying them to Maiduguri you fly them to a temporary base camp half way where they are loaded on coaches and extracted. You need troops to man and defend the camp, medical facilities, force protection for the coaches. Now we need to extract the assault troops? Will you use the same helis and pilots? How do you fuel them?
    Exploit: maybe not necessary for a foreign force but you want to really take advantage of the disarray the enemy will be in by the (hopefully) defeat. Once they are getting the shit kicked out of them, they will be on the radio to other groups you can track other groups using this, you can also publicise the raid to demoralise the enemy, any intelligence material or info from prisoners fed back for future ops. Again part of the reason the Uk made so much noise about the rescue in SL was not just chest beating it was a deliberate phase in the op, to spread the word both by bush radio, word of mouth that the UK was there to stay, they were ready and capable of fighting and would take casualties. It was a very successful exercise.
    Again I’ve slightly hijacked this thread to make the point. There is no sane military man who would advocate an operation to rescue this girls. The only reason to mount an op would be to destroy the enemy at the cost of the hostages, the US is desperately trying to get out of foreign adventures. The last thing Pres Obama wants or needs is another foreign war or even worse an unsuccessful foreign op. No one but the most ridiculous of his opponents actually thinks he is a weak CinC as the Bin Laden raid, drone strikes etc demonstrate so no, I would suggest even if the US discovers them all in a nice little group they will most likely produce a nice strike package and hand it over to Nigeria. they will get the glory and kudos for making it possible if it works and if it goes wrong, they can say truthfully and confidently, we did what we came here to do, its their citizens and their country

  19. saints says:

    thanks oga peccavi? so it would be thier own headache if they allow a force which they have severally called unprofessional and poorly equiped to execute such a delicate hostage rescue operation. if we succeed we prove them wrong if we dont. then it would take years and years for the nigerian armed forces to recover from the resulting media bashing.

  20. Colonel says:

    Oga peccavi. Nice write up! The americans are displaying their foolishness to the world. Its becoming clear that they have an hidden agenda. Anyway, i still believe in the capability of the NA and i know that when they are provided with what they need, they will do a better job.

  21. jimmy says:

    Excellent write up OGA PECCAVI.
    Wow ! you laid bare the complexity of the operation .

    • peccavi says:

      Thanks Oga, its not impossible, and I could be wrong but it is such a risky op, it Is unlikely. If I am wrong and they go in however it will be one of the most complex operations in military history

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