BOKO HARAM: UNITED KINGDOM OPTIMISING SUPPORT TO NIGERIA – BRITISH CHIEF OF DEFENCE STAFF

NEWS AGENCY OF NIGERIA
9 October, 2015
Abuja

The Chief of Defence Staff of the UK, Gen. (Sir) Nicholas Houghton, has pledged his country’s support to the Federal Government in its fight against terrorism.

Houghton told State House correspondents in Abuja on Thursday after a meeting with President Muhammadu Buhari that the United Kingdom was prepared to optimise the support it had offered the Nigerian government in the past. ·

“I am here representing my government in the United Kingdom because we share such an interesting security situation in Nigeria to make sure that whatever help the United Kingdom can give to the government of Nigeria particularly to President Buhari that we are making so that we are optimising what support we can give to him.

“Primarily my concern is in the security situation, particularly the one posed by Boko Haram. “I think the Nigerian armed forces have made some remarkable progress in the last two months in pushing Boko Haram back.

“But as it comes to the end of the rainy season,I know the President has got very strong ambitions to what he can achieve by Christmas.’’

The UK defence chief said that UK had been offering support to the Nigerian Armed Forces in the form of pre-deployment training, adding:“we are going to be optimising that support the best way we can“.

According to him, the threats posed by Boko Haram are no longer localised as they become regional and global.“We now recognise more than everbefore that many of the security threats that are posed are not just localised ones but they are regionalised ones and global ones.

“I think much of the conversation on security in the United Nations Assembly was about the threats posed by extremism and terrorism. “And we share within the United Kingdom and Europe concerns about the destabilising effect of ISIL in Iraq and Syria and North Africa but also the threat that Boko Haram poses here.

“Therefore, in many respects the security in places such as Nigeria, the security concerns here are shared by many within the global community, which is why I think we do need to intensify the help and support we offer.’’

The General said that his country was glad with the progress made by the Nigerian troops in curbing the excesses of the insurgents.

About beegeagle

BEEG EAGLE -perspectives of an opinionated Nigerian male with a keen interest in Geopolitics, Defence and Strategic Studies
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97 Responses to BOKO HARAM: UNITED KINGDOM OPTIMISING SUPPORT TO NIGERIA – BRITISH CHIEF OF DEFENCE STAFF

  1. NTA just reported that a NAF aircraft crashed today in Adamawa. details later

  2. trigger says:

    maybe we should go back to the roots.
    .
    .
    .
    we can’t we structured like the British, armed with Russian weaponry, fight like Americans and expect to win.

    • Sir Kay says:

      Yea, its like wearing a sneakers under Agbada lol

    • jimmy says:

      We are not fighting like the American, in fact that is what let to the showdown where the Americans were sent home, Nigerians for good and bad have fought like Nigerians, We are not expected to win…… We have won. We don’t believe in surgical strikes, , we believe in putting boots on the ground, our red neck officers getting by on 3 hours sleep and staying up all night,, that is why we have a high casualty rate among our officers up to Brigadier level

    • ScouseNaija says:

      Too right Oga Trigger, standardized and streamlined policy-making (procurement,training and tactics) is what our Armed Forces need

  3. jimmy says:

    i believe the roots of the end of BOKO Haram are in sight.
    Military to inaugurate C’ttee to study its Doctrines, Procedures & come up with workable plans to renew the ArmedForces
    The CDS General Olonishakin has instigated a 10 – man committee to oversee this function
    Based on those who are familiar with CDS This is likely to be a brutal assessment, with no holds barred ” OGA everything is fine will not do”
    General OLONISHAKIN belongs to RC25 yes the same class that produced LT . GEN KTJ Minimah ( COAS) and Air MARSHALL Adeoshun (CAS), in the coming days a lot of things will be changing inthe ARMED FORCES
    OGA SIR KAY
    Nigeria has despite it’s mistakes recovered enough to subsequently drive the enemy to the margins there is nothing absolutely nothing wrong with British Soldiers who are highly skilled in training Nigerians who use Russian Weaponry.
    G o and look at what is happening to the SAUDIS who are getting pounded in YEMEN, do you know that parts of RURAL SAUDI ARE NO GO AREAS?
    Let us be careful what we say , after all some people still fantasize how we should be fighting with stick and stones and were bitterly upset with the recent turn in events ,.

  4. zachary999 says:

    Another F-7 has killed one of our promising young men… NA wah !

  5. buchi says:

    seems the F-7 lost thrust an went into a stall on landing approach from what i was told damnnnnn, this evening has too many unsavory stories
    Nyanya comes to mind

  6. Manny Aydel says:

    May the soul of the gallant pilot find eternal repose and may God Almighty strengthen his family at this time. Long live the NAF. Long live the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

  7. Are James says:

    I believe and stand to be corrected that the F7 has weird flight dynamics issues at some particular speed, altitude and attitude configuration. I believe the original MIG 21 specs have been so tinkered with in such a wholly empirical manner and without extensive wind tunnel verification of stability iat all flight envelopes that we should really be concerned. The problem with military aircraft is that overall usage rates are so sparing amd piloting skills so significant to mission success that design defects can be hidden for years. The man who bought these “fighter-bombers” for us is still alive but we have probably lost four (4) pilots as at now.

    • gbash10 says:

      @Are James, it is two pilots now, the first a Wing Commander in Kano and yesterday another warrior, May he RIP!

    • gbash10 says:

      @Are James, it is two pilots now, the first a Wing Commander in Kano and yesterday another warrior, May he RIP!
      The F-7 that caught fire in Abuja,the pilot survived and the FT-7 that had engine problem over Yandev ,close to Gboko,the two pilots ejected successfully.

  8. Henry says:

    We’ve now lost a total of 5 F-7s. As is to be expected, cries of newer Fighter Jets to replace the F-7 would begin……… After a couple of days, it would be business as usual.

  9. zachary999 says:

    [video src="https://ia801508.us.archive.org/15/items/iqtham_201510/iqtham.mp4" /]

    I am a bit confused as to what has happened in the new BH video, looks like a bit of Photoshopping from BH but I also believe there was an element of surprise caused probably by a feinting attack

    May the souls of the gallant soldiers RIP.

    • tim says:

      What link is this?…..I can’t open it

      • Sir Kay says:

        Oga Time, copy the link from where it starts at https and ends at mp4, without the quotes.
        Basically its a vid of bh misbehaving, I’m surprised these guys last these long, I mean, they aren’t even docking from bullets, weird. I don’t like watching their vids, so i don’t waste my time on them

  10. trigger says:

    the squadron operating the F-7s is ‘the young tigers’ . those guys are good. unfortunately they have a useless aircraft and a more useless politicians.

  11. jimmy says:

    http://www.punchng.com/news/dont-mingle-with-politicians-buratai-warns-soldiers/
    * Issue of human rights
    * issue of uniforms
    Thank god SOMEONE IS READING THIS BLOG!

    • Colloid says:

      I don’t think the “tipping” is only from this blog alone as there are those in the “arena” that knows what they want– but because the past ‘rulers'(they aint LEADERS but RULERS–a leader leads by example and serves his subordinate unlike a ruler that doen’t care about his subordinate’s welfare) were not ready to look and do something about their requests.
      So many ‘eagles’ the world over tracked this blog to glean something from it. So, i still agree with you that”Someone” is reading and listening to advise from concerned and patriotic Nigerians on this blog.

      • Sir Kay says:

        ha, i know right, these people aren’t idiots, whatever ideas we might have here, I’m sure they know about most, one thing is to know, another is to implement, which is what they fail to do most of the time

  12. Tobey says:

    Most fighter jets crashes are caused by pilot error. That’s the reason why serious Air Forces invest in 4th Gen Aircraft. These assets reduce pilot input as much as possible. But the NAF is flying a glorified Mig-21 in 2015.
    The Giant of Africa is defended by less than 10 Mig-21s and obsolete Roland ADSs. Ok na.

    • solorex says:

      The basic reasons for transitioning from 3rd gen to 4th gen by jet fighter by manufacturer are
      1. Reduce human errors that cause most crashes, loss of platform, and missed targets e.t.c by handing over most onerous task to machine (computer). Here we have RSS based systems to replace traditional FCS-more maneuverability –less risks; we have advance weapons guidance system to ensure you don’t have to bomb a whole village to kill a tank.

      2. Reduce cost of maintenance+ maintenance related absence considerably by replacing maintenance intensive technology with better ones or outright modular replaceable parts.

      3. Improve performance by allowing machine to operate at extreme level where human are most prone to error-less fatigue from everybody-from Terrain avoidance systems to terrain Hugging Systems

      4. Reduce flight management burden on the pilot and GCS officers –less fatigue for everybody

      5. Multirole capacity- instead of having 6 types of Aircrafts for 6 dissimilar task-one highly endowed one will do all. This is a method of saving maintenance money and improving overall force availability

      The whole story is simple-less money (compared to capacity and roles), less maintenance (compared to capacity and roles), Better survivability, More availability, lesser pilot and GC errors…….. You miss out on all this when you refuse to do the transition. You also make a lot of airmen widows with your refusal.

      This is systematic laxity induced sabotage and human sacrifice-I can’t find harsher words!

      • Are James says:

        Leadership issues bordering on treason. One joker of a CDS went on the news lamenting the lack of capital budget outlay to buy jets during his send forth recently. The implication was that he was never really qualified for the job of CDS in the first place. Nobody else is tasked with making a case to civilian leadership and managing defence funds like the CDS. So we have been playing with fire for long and it is human.

    • ozed says:

      Sorry (for digressing) but i have always been skeptical of the pilot error statistic. It is too convenient. The pilot is typically the only one who typically does not survive to state his case, and even if he does he has no witnesses.

      The Air-force and the aircraft manufacturers (who are typically the other major factors) have enormous paraphernalia with which to cover their backsides.

      Thus most of the time the poor deceased pilot is the convenient dumping ground for all the blame.

  13. Colloid says:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/10/09/russia-s-new-mega-missile-stuns-the-globe.html

    EXCERPTS:
    “Russian reconnaissance had discovered a number of important objects of militants, which were to be destroyed IMMEDIATELY,” the Russian Defense Ministry explained in a statement”.
    NOTE: No Dulling Moments. **Seek and Severe**. A threat seen and destroyed before it would fester. They are not wasting time on propaganda and too much “see-my-hand” stance, seek and destroy.

    “What’s particularly striking is that Moscow has been able to build this long-range naval strike capability with much smaller vessels than anyone thought possible. In the U.S. Navy, large destroyers, cruisers, and submarines carry Tomahawk cruise missiles—and those vessels are typically at least 500 feet long and displace as many as 9,000 tons of water.
    The four brand-new warships that launched the SS-N-30s were much, much smaller—ranging in length from 200 to 330 feet and displacing no more than 1,500 tons of water. “SMALL SHIPS, BIG FIREPOWER,” Wertheim commented”.
    NOTE: SMALL SHIPS, BIG FIREPOWER. The size doesn’t reduced the power and accuracy the beast carries. To Nigeria, the size doesn’t matter, the armaments and firepower such weapons/hardwares carries is the “yeast of the flour”. We’ve seen template of how badly a Landcruiser could be uparmoured to. Igirigi comes to mind as well.

  14. AOk says:

    Loss of life is always sad but it is a high risk environment fighter pilots operate in. Attrition is part of ANY airforce until the time when it’s all AI (artificial intelligence).

    If true that the F7s are operating close to their limits, it is only a matter of time before we lose crews and aircraft.

    What concerns me is the number of pilots lost who don’t seem to eject.

    Is it part of the culture that our pilots go down with their planes? If so, this does not make sense.
    This is why there are zero speed, zero altitude ejector seats so that expensively highly trained pilots can jump from stricken machines and live to fight another day (assuming the NAF will replace lost fighters.)

    • ozed says:

      Eye witness accounts say the guy ejected but the strong windstorms going on at the time slammed the poor guy into a tree and killed him.

      Real sad.

      Regarding the low incidence of ejection, this might have to do with the fact that developing countries like Nigeria have more pilots than fighter planes, thus pilots fight till the last minute to save their expensive mounts. By the time the pilot has exhausted all his options, the stricken aircraft is typically too low for a safe eject (except if you are working with the more modern aircraft which can virtually eject safely from the ground).

      • AOk says:

        @ Chief Ozed, if only the air force released more details to confirm the actual circumstances but they have the ‘saycuritee’ mentality.

        Will be very surprised if the F7s do not have 0/0 ejection seats.

  15. Colloid says:

    A little calculation here:

    “In the U.S. Navy, large destroyers, cruisers, and submarines carry Tomahawk cruise missiles—and those vessels are typically at least 500 feet long and displace as many as 9,000 tons of water.
    The four (RUSSIA)brand-new warships that launched the SS-N-30s were much, much smaller—ranging in length from 200 to 330 feet and displacing no more than 1,500 tons of water.
    Russia(water displacement)-1,500tons
    US(water displacement)-5000tons
    Russia(vessel size)— 200-330 feets compared to
    US(vessel size)—500 feets.

    Quantity is irrelevant where Quality resides. Small ship with enormous capacity.

    I was stunned at the miles this missiles went before hitting their targets right inside Syria–over a thousand miles, that’s staggering. Tomahawk now has a brother– Big Brother or Mate– who can tell. Russia is really keen in showing the world they are still relevant on the world stage.

  16. Sir Kay says:

    People, i beg, let’s no post videos or pictures of our dead soldiers while being killed in action, just saw the full video link posted on here, it just sucks, no matter what, let’s not spread that stuff, yes its out there, great, those that want to see it should go and dig them out. Bastards bokos

  17. tim says:

    And we are killing an exact round figure of 100….and get two gpmg’s……tears in my eyes!!!……apparently we had equipment to fight,bad planning must have caused this disaster…..I can’t blame the t-72,an rpg might have taken it out….

    • Are James says:

      Some field officers are slack. Let us be honest. Some of the lag areas are fundamental basic infantry tactics and discipline.

      • ozed says:

        COAS just alluded to the fact that our boys fled once more at Geidam in spite of functional equipment at their disposal.
        Like Beegy and a couple of guys mentioned, troops who will run will run even if they each have GPMGs and are supported by 20mm wielding gun trucks. Our boys who did us proud in Liberia and Sierra Leone were not much better armed than our boys are currently, and they had zero body amour!!!

    • Roscoe says:

      It should not deploy without infantry supporting, they would have taken it out. Seems to be some sort of forward OP/CP.

  18. Ola says:

    My humble opinions; sad that NAF has again lost one of the F-7s. Someone here called them flying coffins sometime ago and I tend to agree with that. The two problems here are:
    the air force has too few equipment there by leading to over working of the few equipment available. The more aircraft you have, the more you will be able to spread out operational hours among the aircraft and reduce the average flying time among your fleet.
    Secondly, we need to consider this, the Russians have the best ejector seat design in the world, has China been able to copy this when they copied the MiG 21 that is the F-7? I doubt it.
    The cost of training a supersonic fighter pilot (in time and money) is enormous and it is simply penny wise pound foolish to train a fighter pilot that flies supersonic and pull g-forces successfully and at the end put them in flying coffins to operate.
    Let NAF retire their fleet of F-7s from front line duties and designate them for advanced fighter pilot training only. Let FG+Ministry of Defence+NAF put heads together and haul in a decent fleet for once.
    I have sang it before, I would sing it here again. This is an airforce for the next 15-25 years
    2 squadrons of SU-25-dedicated close support aircraft
    2 Squadrons of SU-30 MKK/SU-35-Multirole but consigned to air defence and deep strike.
    1 Squadron of MiG 35 (modernised)-Dedicated interceptor
    1 Squadrons of Yak 130 -Alpha jet replacement

    Helicopters
    2 Squadrons of Ka-52
    1 Squadron of Mi-35m
    1/2 a squadron of Mil -17 heavy lift
    In addition, advance flying school and maintenance facility for all the equipment in the country.
    Comprehensive ground radar system should be bought along
    A contract of a decade of training, localised maintenance and cooperation with the Russians should be signed along.
    A deposit of a quarter of the cost of the entire fleet would sign the contract, initiate delivery directly form Russia and seal the deal.
    This will provide jobs for pilots, mechanics and other local industry that will spring up for their support and supply and before they are retired, experience learnt form handling the fleet would provide Nigeria with a very solid and deep knowledge in military aviation such that local content in future fleet would be significant.
    Secondly, I posted a while ago that Nigeria would benefit from the UK and the UK is interested in closer military ties with Nigeria. I hope this gesture of a visit would be taken advantage of by the Nigerian government and armed forces. If we think towards development of Nigerian space agency, then it is not hard to see the benefit that Nigeria can enjoy from closer military ties with the UK.

  19. Augustine says:

    The British are coming in late. The Americans were smarter.

    https://beegeagle.wordpress.com/2014/06/26/united-states-govt-transfer-military-equipment-to-the-nigerian-army-2/

    When I raised this issue last month, my honourable ogas here saw it from a clouded point of view of ‘begging’ for help. Now we can hear the British CDS saying it clearly : ” General Houghton said Britain is aware of the efforts Nigeria Armed Forces had put in to subdue insurgency in the North East, noting that the time is ripe for Nigeria allies to render all necessary forms of assistance to reinforce the capability of the Nigerian Armed Forces.”

    You don’t go to war all alone in the case of an unjust invasion of your sovereign land and nation by an unjust aggressor. It’s a universal principle of international diplomacy, allies who have a little military friendship tie or economic friendship must chip in little pieces of material support as a show of friendship and solidarity. Any such nation/ally not doing anything is disregarding your country in war time.

    The Americans don’t like the past GEJ government, yet the USA knew the global rules and quickly cleared their name/conscience on the pages of history with the non-lethal army equipment sent in June 2014 before things became rough all over the place. The British were carried away by whatever bias they had, now they too want to enter the history page of supportive allies before the Boko Haram war ends and records will show forever that the Bonny light crude oil and gas drinking Shell petroleum royal empire did nothing.

    I don’t personally expect much from them, Britain is stingy with gifts, they will drop some pennies worth of materials or training to enter record books and mark register that Britain was here too against Boko Haram with some peanut freebies.

    Germany and Japan, I am waiting for your turn. Stop acting like you don’t know the universal rules. You both dump your exports massively on Nigerian soil, and we send dollars to you in billions every year in trade payments. Stop the ‘insult’, Berlin and Tokyo.

    Maybe our complaint here last month got to the British diplomatic corp via this blog one way or the other, we never know who is reading. We are not begging you Europeans or Japanese, we are just telling you that Nigerians are not fools, we are writing our war history books, we want to make a list of those who take Nigeria for granted. What goes around comes around.

  20. Augustine says:

    How many F-7 jets do we have left now ?

  21. Are James says:

    Ok. We knew it will come down to this. They are baiting Putin in Syria. The West is very cunning.

    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/raf-given-green-light-shoot-133352631.html

  22. Are James says:

    9 pieces. Hopefully all of them will soon all crash ( without loss of life of any pilots).
    Then we will realise that we never had an air force.

  23. Augustine says:

    May the NAF pilot R.I.P. Amen…

    ….but how many more aircraft losses do we need to pray and fast to prevent?

    Low quality cheap affordable poor performing jet fighter.

    Over-worked due to shortage of aircraft numbers. Fatigue and failure sets in on engine avionics, flight instruments.

    Tight schedule for sorties in a hurry to end Boko War by December deadline.

    Ejection seat seems a problem for NAF aircraft, we don’t save lives.

    NAF said they exist big time, cool comments with shortage of fixed wing aircraft on the increase, attrition is eating up your jet fighter fleet oga NAF, remember President Buhari warned you on fixed wing aircraft availability few months ago.

    Truth is bitter, and it eventually reveals itself after some time.

    How many F-7 jets are really operational today? How many Alpha jets and Albatross jets? All MBB-339 jets are not operational, no need to consult oracle for that information, they are abandoned in Italy.

    You say your war is COIN and you are in no hurry to buy jets, well your conventional war jets are reducing in number day by day, you want to wait until you have only two remaining?

  24. jimmy says:

    oga aigustine
    i wrote an article in the last thread about the recent visit,
    Based on what I know and the facts stated on the ground it is not that the Nigerian Army is struggling but they need help, in terms of coordination, communication and advanced SF skills.
    They need help to get to the advanced stage of leadership at the mid – officer level ( Maj/ / Lt .Col) level) ..Lastly based on the unreported incidents of what happened b/w the American when they came to Nigeria it is best either the Brits train Nigerians or the Russians do it in Russia, right now the track record of the Americans is appalling to say the least.
    .@ Geidam unless the information given to me was different they did not run but retreated into the town when they were faced with overwhelming numbers, .
    And any Tank can be taken out as we have seen in Yemen so let us not get over excited, the bh savages were booted out in less than 6 hours mistakes will happen that is why we have erasers on pencils, and despite billions of dollars Nato convoys they are attacked on a regular basis.. by the Taliban. case in point Kundz
    @ oga OLA , please go and read the piece i wrote on the previous thread, Nigeria needs THE UK help in setting up a Hertfordshire – like infrastructure to build an sas type headquarters for their SF.regimental training and advancement from private to Warrant officer class 2 needs to be up-graded. .Recently the NA had the Seargent / Warrant officer ( Senior Non – Commissioned officer training but it is once a year in light of what is going on in the NE it should be twice a year.

    • Ola says:

      Nigeria does need the help of the UK in setting up certain units and developing/popularising certain capabilities among troops. What I am sure of is that the Uk will not immediately offer Nigeria an SAS set up training. Yes, the UK helped in setting up the SBS but this time around, the UK is primarily interested in first helping Nigeria regain discipline and fighting skills among all it’s troops. That is a wide scale army shake up, if you ask me. What Nigeria can and will immediately get are seasoned Royal Marines instructors who would help in training brigade sized contingents in core battle tactics, discipline, weapons training and discipline and survivability in general. Among other things I know, I can confidently tell you that the amateur video of a Nigerian soldier trapped in an open field with BH savages shooting at him caused quite ripples here and the question going around has been “who trained that guy?” or “How did Nigeria get to that level” The UK military has this directly in its site and if Nigeria openly welcomes it, very rapidly, RM instructors would be on ground in Nigeria to train NA troops and simultaneously, more NCOs and young/middle level Cos would be welcome to the UK for training and exercises which they can bring back home to spread among their subordinates.
      The UK is well aware of the fact that Nigeria has received training from different countries too, some of which even operate on the doctrines taught by the UK. The UK is therefore ready to work with Nigeria to consolidate on the diverse training received by different units of the NA. It is from within this unit that an elite unit like the SAS would be selected in the near future, definitely after the first phase of training has been concluded. Watch out. I am also sure that depending on the broadness of training Nigeria accepts form the UK, Nigeria may play host to to some RM and SAS/commando vets participating in the training as well as currently serving RM instructors all coming directly form the UK. The UK outpost in Kenya will also send some men to participate in the training. Lethal aids will not be part of the things on offer now, only training. But the UK is very willing to do business with Nigeria and depending on how the training phase goes, Nigeria could get lethal aids within a very short time from now.

      • beegeagle says:

        I have a question for you, Ola.

        Why is it that in Africa, the British like to come in after the worst of the fighting has taken place and then they proceed to rewrite the story of the entire war with help from their amenable media?

        They did it to ECOMOG in Sierra Leone and now that they are talking about sending troops to Somalia and South Sudan, I can only imagine that a rehash of the unsavoury is on the cards.

        Just wondering aloud.

      • Ola says:

        Sir Beegs, I can only guess two main factors are responsible for this, economy and global image. Well, in a war, you can eat your cake and have at the same time when the fighting parties are all tired and worn out. This has been the approach of the UK to foreign engagements in general in recent times, except in Afghanistan and Iraq. The UK will not actively commit a lot to Syria or Iraq or Libya or else where in Africa. Yes, some SAS activity, Special OPs here and there, but no full scale or major engagement and it’s the same media thing you just asked about now that is happening with RAF patrols of NATO skies of the baltic region which is over hyped. I explain more below.
        1. Economy. The UK is no longer the economic power house it used to be and the government is not ready to expend huge resources in prosecuting “another man’s war”. The participation in NATO operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan did not help the economic considerations of war at all in the UK. So except the UK is directly threatened, the UK will not come forward to fight but the UK still wants to be a global power to recon with, so the UK will talk and get bureaucratically involved in every major conflict across the globe.
        2. Reduction in power projecting ability. The UK’s ability to project power abroad as it once did is reducing. We (UK) still have one of the best fighting forces in the world and huge resources continues to go to training and upkeep of troops. The UK however wants to keep a modest army to protect herself or surgically strike abroad when the need arises, without committing too much resources to it and nothing long term. This means limited number of troops and equipment. To favour this, the doctrine of the UK training has changed significantly in the last couple of years, fewer, tougher fighting men but many to spare in long term engagements that does not directly benefit the UK abroad. Any direct involvement/front line role in an African conflict would mean long term engagement i.e. huge foreign commitment=huge wear and tear on equipment=huge military spending in equipment procurements, repairs and upgrade= constituents asking for the heads of their parliamentarians on a platter. this would change again though as the global societal dynamics continues on this path of unrest…The UK would rather export/sell capabilities (training of man power) to other nations and let them do the fighting afterwards and this has been a very successful strategy in certain areas.
        3. Political correctness. The UK no longer wants to be seen as the dominant colonialist. They would rather allow existing states get busy with their problems and play supporting roles. This is good in the sense that the UK does not appear aggressive on the global stage and the UK does not take responsibility for anything that happens afterwards. The UK would rather fight proxy wars, lots of meetings with the favourite side in the fight, working behind the scenes and getting minimally involved physically with a lot of media hype on our involvement-sad but true. This means no body bags are sent home, minimum amount of money is spent, the UK appears to be on top of the situation and everyone is happy! Expect minimum or no engagement from the UK troops going to Somalia and South Sudan, they would be going on the platform of UN as peace keepers and instructors/trainers not enforcers. No enforcement and if they are in danger, they will withdraw except if absolutely cornered. Very different form what the french do. See it also as local politicians and political parties playing chess with the whole thing too.
        I would just round off by saying engagement with Nigeria will be different though, Nigeria is of economic and strategic importance to the UK and Nigerian politicians need to know this.

      • Sir Kay says:

        It’s because they want to remain relevant, same reason the USA borrow money , only to give it out as aid to developing countries, they know once that aid dries up, so would their influence. Its all politics.
        These people largely stood by while our people were dying, now that bh is almost beaten, then they wanna help? smh

      • Ola says:

        Sir Kay, the aspect of relevance, I partially agree with but standing by while people were dying from BH? No. The UK stood by ready to help but;
        1. waiting for Nigeria to have a strategy to deal with it
        or
        2. Waiting for Nigeria to approach the UK with clear, specific request.

        Nigeria turned to the Americans instead and Nigeria did not admit that they were having problems for a long time. Later, Nigeria turned to PMCs, which turned out to be a good idea. The UK saw through this self deception and self inflicted confusion but could not just jump in like that!

      • Capt Tobias Wilcock says:

        Dear Ogas, Nigerian military is not helpless and always subserviant and asking for help as if it has no clue, true it is in need of assistance ( except if all the men sent on all this very expensive training course are from a pool of interlectually challenged people) . It is worrisome that we are presented as having no clue after all that has happened.
        Pls quote as as follows
        It may be useful to look at the words in terms of their etymological origins. Help is Anglo-Saxon, assist is French. Help is used in concrete situations, in general, in ordinary life . Assist is used in formal, academic, and institutional situations, as in surgery, where it often means just watching and very occasionally doing something useful, or international diplomacy, where it might mean any sort of request someone else finds useful.
        Aid – in modern English, is more appropriate for non-human help
        Assist – would be help for something that someone could do themselves but because of the assistance is able to do that thing more efficiently, profitably, effectively, etc.
        Help – is the most generic term and can refer to any sort of support.
        Facilitate – is help that is necessary for a thing to be done or that improves the utility of that thing to such a degree that it would not be worth doing but for the facilitation.
        Assist means to give help or support, especially as a subordinate or supplement; aid.
        Help is a synonym of assist without being associated with subordination or mechanical devices.
        In a strict sense, assistance implies a subordination of the assistant ( Britain) in a way that help does not.

        Webster’s describes the difference in this way: “HELP carries a strong implication of advance toward an objective (every little bit helps)…. ASSIST distinctively imputes a secondary role to the assistant or a secondary character (Britain) to the assistance (Nigeria is core executioner of the task and knows what it needs to apply to execute the required task).

        Oga Ola, On the matter of disciple, I can but agree more than ever, it forms the pivot of every military and the British soldier is a master of it, it made the little island nation colonize the world at it’s prime, The historical basis of the British professional force is different from that grew from the volunteer minute man.
        The amatuer video footag of the Nigerian soldiers does not reflect on that individuals training, there is a lot of circumstatnce that may have put him in tht position trainined or not, just the same that put many British marines/soldiers in hermam Afganistan in the open. his primary response would have been his firearm, but what if he was out of ammo. what if he waited to cover the retreat of his comrades.
        He did the warriors thing, he did not surrender to be butchered and fought hand to hand and appeared to have taken his initial attacker down, I am thought and trained that if the situation cannot be helped and I should feel your blade in my heart, you would definately be feeling my blade in yours and there is no disgrace in that.
        the position that troope found himself is wrong and might go well to be a great problem with tatical deployment than individual training or his will to fight. It should not be a thing of pride that any military puts his troops in that position.

        “Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” ~ Abraham Lincoln
        Discipline starts from well outside the battle field, the barracks, parade, interraction with civilian populace and comliance with laws and on the road.
        The British assistance is welcome.

  25. jimmy says:

    sorry Oga Augustine.

    • Augustine says:

      Thanks oga jimmy. God bless you for your analysis, I see your point of view. I do share your opinion on Geidam battle, I wanted to write but no longer necessary, your comment clears a vital point as to what might have happened and why such sometimes happen in war. It’s no video game, this is reality of war.

    • Are James says:

      late ejection by pilot.
      I think we have nine “fighter bombers”left in the Nigerian Trainer Aircraft Force (NTAF). MB 339 and LZ 39 have probably beend sold.
      4 SU 25 KM and 2 SU 25 UB expected if the money is made available.

      This is the tragic story of the NTAF that the previous military leadership left a country that the previous government said was a $650bn economy.

    • gbash10 says:

      I learnt that the late pilot was Sqd Ldr Sylvester…… ……..,can’t give the full name of the deceased Warrior.
      Does it mean the airport at Yola and Maiduguri can not forecast the weather at all ? The F-7 with its MiG-21 style air intake, sucking sand and dust,hence cutting the power out of the single turbo fan engine.
      Could it be that it was a low-level flight?
      Hmmmm…………………..!

      • lachit says:

        fluke FOD damage ?
        also at low level flights mig 21 type aircrafts r tad difficult to control can easily exceed critical flight control regimes without the pilots knowledge, it happens in seconds.

  26. trigger says:

    nigerian airforce now Nigerian airline force.

    soon to be Nigerian politician transport group.

    we are all tired, we’ve all said the right words, some screamed, some begged, some went to twitter, some even cried.

    yet they never listened.

    from 15 F-7s now we have 10 yet they still haven’t listened.

    go back five years down the archives of this blog and you’ll see and pleading and begging.

    yet no change.

    but we all desire change.

  27. Kola Adekola says:

    My Oga’s, can this article be true?

    CHIEF OF ARMY STAFF CONDEMNS COWARDLY ATTITUDE OF SOLDIERS WHO FLED FROM BOKO HARAM
    Sunday, 11 October 2015 14:08

    CHIEF of army staff Lt General Tukur Buratai has castigated troops of the Nigerian Army and called them cowardly for abandoning their weapons and fleeing in the face of a Boko Haram attack at Geidam in Yobe State.

    Last week, Boko Haram terrorists attacked the town killing dozens in a bloody Fun, forcing local resident to flee. Lt General Buratai was unhappy about the fact that Geidam had a unit of soldiers’ posters there who should have been able to fend off the attack but in the face of enemy fire they fled.

    Speaking in Lagos during his maiden tour of units and commands under the 81st Division of the Nigerian Army, Lt General Buratai emphasised the need for a serious review of the attitude of the troops towards the ongoing war. He noted that despite having the necessary weapons and equipment that will enable them protect themselves, civilians and properties, the soldiers in Geidam did not attack the insurgents.

    Lt General Buratai said: “Two, three days back, I was in Geidam and the attitude of our troops calls for a serious review because they have the equipment, weapons and everything they require to protect themselves and indeed citizens that are there. However, they just went and sat down without adopting the proper battle procedures.

    “I have given them very strong warning and some of you may find yourselves around that area and if you go there, you must behave very professionally. You must apply all the battle principles that you have been taught and deploy the weapons and equipment properly.”

    He added that he had to go to Geidam after the Boko Haram attack to see things for himself, assuring that the loopholes are being addressed. According to General Buratai, immediately after his visit, Boko Haram attempted to move into Geidam but the soldiers stood up and conquered that attack and pursued them and the terrorists have been on the run ever since.

    Lt General Buratai also warned army personnel to remain apolitical, stressing that their moves were being monitored and anyone found romancing politicians will be dealt with accordingly. He also insisted that the December deadline given by President Muhammadu Buhari for the military to end Boko Haram was achievable.

    http://www.nigerianwatch.com/news/7955-chief-of-army-staff-condemns-cowardly-attitude-of-soldiers-who-fled-from-boko-haram#sthash.hkwufF48.dpuf

    • Kola Adekola says:

      Please take note that there is no direct quote of Gen. Buratai actually using the term “cowardly”.
      However, the quotes from him are revealing about terrible attitudes that exist within sections of the army. What can we do to cure this and get on top of boko haram? They are a mere ragtag army of semi-literate, drugged up thugs who can’t even handle their weapons properly, talk less have any worthwhile military training.

      • asorockweb says:

        Malaise.

        Lives were lost.

        We need to reconvene the Court Martials.

        “But because I believe that the reward of discipline is greater than its immediate objective, I would not have you think that discipline without objective is possible: in its nature discipline involves the subjection of the soul to some perhaps minor end; and that end must be real, if the discipline is not to be factitious. Therefore I think that all things which evolve discipline: study and our duties to men and the Commonwealth, war, and personal hardship, and even the need for subsistence, ought to be greeted by us with profound gratitude; for only through them can we attain to the least detachment; and only so can we know peace.”
        Robert Oppenheimer, quoted in Freeman Dyson’s From Eros to Gaia

  28. mcshegz says:


    Give me more satellites, UAV’s, sensors and smart weapons any day.
    Say hello to the future of warfare.
    Why must we play catch up when we can leap-frog; GSM comes to mind;
    from 40,000 lines to 180 million plus and counting, in under a decade; power of technology!
    What must Nigeria do in under a decade to attain perpetual, real-time, and tactical targeting systems covering the entire west and central Africa? impossible? so was said about Nigeria’s GSM foray. Look at us now.
    NAIJA. I HAIL THEE

    • mcshegz says:

      Picture from
      @nigerian_armed.forces

      • solorex says:

        Here are my thoughts

        1. The first set of Indian rockets tests were done, processed and monitored with simple codes written on and running of simple desktop system-less than 4 decades ago- today India belongs to elite group of long range rockets and missiles technology owners.

        2. Pakistan needed a homemade fly by wire and system integration software but they do not have enough military ADA software engineers .They wanted something they are in control of and can tweak at will- they soon realized there are several universities in Pakistan teaching C++ a basically civilian software language with similar functionality -so they did something wise- they decided to write bulk of the program in C++. Today they have a proven platform running of C++- the JF17

        3. The Indians decided not to contract their Tejas FBW software to French companies and in 6 years they have a working Tejas- all cleared for flights.

        4. 2.5 decades ago Chinese UAVs were not more than RC planes with less than fantastic camera- their best technology war inertial guidance circuitry and basic Japanese Programmable Logic Controller for controls- they couldn’t land on their own- they were parachute recovered. Basically cut the power and open the chute! Today Chinese is the only country with over 100 UAV project (private and military sectors in progress)- After US- they are the only really proven UAV tech owners.
        Here is my Point Sir,
        You don’t need to start big or wait for free Oyinbo Launch-All that is in that picture can be made implemented with over the shelf components and workshop fabricated hardware

        On the ground you will have:
        1. Regular desktop screens
        2. A PC running a regular
        3. Dedicated Visual C++ software-visual GPS to Map overlay codes+ signal encryption code generator/demodulator
        4. Location transmitter and receiver modules
        5. Regular microwave transceivers
        On the UAV you will have
        1. GPS receiver with data out terminals
        2. Microwave of RF transceivers
        3. Portable signal encryption/demodulator
        4. Programmable logic controllers running command codes and operating control surfaces actuators
        5. Independent Microwave Tx/Rx HD camera
        6. Commercial laser range finder with data out
        All other necessary stuffs are just codes!
        I know Nigerian engineers that are running/coding far more complicated industrial systems than this.
        Its far much more complicated ( say 20 times more) to design a Wireless Scada based control system for modular refinery than a UAV control system-And we have Nigerians doing this Already.

        What we need is just a guy with the initiative and will to see it done.

      • mcshegz says:

        Need i say more!!
        Now, one human being will come here and spit gibberish like “it will take Nigeria nothing more than a generation to achieve feats like these”
        like dude; are you in the digital age or are you still opening your tv cabinet and cranking it with a freaking spanner?
        Well, whether you believe you can or you cannot; you are right.
        Its all about the ability to envision a future so vivid that its almost impossible to fail.
        I get it we have to keep up with the Joneses, yes, buy a a squadron or two of 5th gen Fighter jets, but our greatest efforts most be dedicated towards technologies of the future.
        NAIJA I HAIL THEE.
        Oga Solorex. I respect your hustle sir.

  29. jimmy says:

    Thank you
    OGA OLA for your very succinct comments.
    What the Nigerian Army needs is to bridge the GAP between what I would term as inconsistency. the recapture of MUBI, BAGA, defence of BIU, KONDUNGA made me beat my chest with pride , Geidam for all the problems , happened within a 12 hour span and does not represent Nigeria’s finest, it is noteworthy the Chief was there the next day.
    Regardless of the minor setback any fool can produce a video.
    This war is coming to an end I am calling it here, what happens next will be the real hard work.

    • Roscoe says:

      The video is relatively unimportant, the LP or CP was hit, the T 72 backed away due to the presence of light infantry (it was probably going after the gun trucks) and the men on ground withdrew under fire abandoning their ammo. We dont know what was going on with them, did they fear being over run or cut off? It was clear no relief was forth coming since BH shot images of themselves packing up the left over equipment, the men made a decision to withdraw… I would not judge without understanding what happened. But definitely, it did not reflect well on the NA.

  30. drag_on says:

    9 F-7s’ to defend 180 million people represented by a National Assembly that cost $600million per year to maintain,gratuities not included. I guess politics is more important to National Security than Defence.

    • Augustine says:

      Shall the FG give Nigeria a new minister for defence that will solve the jet fighter problem of NAF ?

    • Roscoe says:

      I always thought the F 7s were transitional aircraft, it seems that was it. That’s a relatively under armed, short range aircraft.

      • Capt Tobias Wilcock says:

        The F7 grew out of basically a point defence aircraft ( MIG -21s) with very potent interceptor platform capabilities, it can carry out ground strikes ( about the same or less ordnance than the A-Jet, due to it’s design to carry lighter weighing AA missiles for it’s primary high speed intercept missions aimed at dedicated bombers), but that hardly makes it a COIN aircraft, which was designed with very efficient handling capabilities, fuel/endurance at low altitudes and low speed regimes. We are once again applying the aircraft not appropriate for the task at the other end of the spectrum ( like A- Jets), The cause of the crash has not been ascertained, the maintenance of this light fighter is not has heavy and complex to that required by the heavy metals/ SU30s.
        A lot of the SU-30 operators fly this F7s along even during operation.
        Another question would be the level of experience of the crew, Pls I do not in any way doubt their competence. but if you are pushing the envelope then there must be matching skills and level of experience in that activity. Venezuela recently lost an SU-30 during a drug interdiction operation, wrong aircraft for the task. The COIN tasks require high maneuverability at low speed and altitude. This young Tigers are very precious and must not be wasted for any reason ( they are the crew of our future 4/5th generation platforms). Why has it become so difficult to get the proper COIN aircraft, why must things be continuously be done hap hazard. It all bears a price no matter how it is painted. Like I mentioned a while a go I am yet to see a Doc Adadevoh here that would bluntly refuse to apply the wrong treatment and stand up for our young heroes. May the soul of the lost flyers rest in peace and condolence to their families, friend , loved ones and their Squadron brothers.

  31. lachit says:

    hi all
    looks like russia has a propsal to sell S400 ‘Triumph’ LR-SAM to india to counter ballistic missiles ie to fill the void untill the indigeneous ABM programmes becomes mature enough.

    this S-400 SAM would make use of israeli IAI’s latest EL/M-2090U UHF-band active phased-array LRTR.
    IAI-ELTA’s ELM-2090U UHF ULTRA Early Warning and long range search and track radars are a family of transportable land-based radar systems designed to autonomously detect and simultaneously track dozens of Ballistic Missiles (BMs), satellites and airborne targets at very long ranges. The radar operates under all weather conditions and in the presence of dense
    electromagnetic environments. The modular digital Active Electronic Steering Array (AESA) includes thousands of transmit/receive modules and digital units which provide high redundancy, graceful degradation, high reliability and high availability.The modular design enables the construction of scalable radar configurations using multiple antenna building blocks (clusters) according to customer requirements.
    Modular design consist of 1,6 clusters, and up to 22 clusters.
    IAF will use a combination of EL/M-2090U’s ULTRA C-6 version and C-22 version

    also Russia has proposed for the IAF two HYPERSONIC endo-atmospheric missiles, the 77N6-N and the 77N6-NI, having top speeds of 7km/second and also being the first SAMs of Russian origin to possess INERT warheads, i.e. warheads that do not contain any explosives and instead, are ‘hit to kill, meaning they will destroy inbound TBMs, IRBMs or MRBMs by sheer force of impact.
    The most revolutionary element of the 77N6-N and the 77N6-NI hypersonic LR-SAMs will be their on-board nose-mounted, Ka-band millimeter-wave active phased-array radar seekers and their real-time discrimination algorithms required for fire-control and guidance of hit-to-kill interceptors. To this end, the radar seekers have been designed with a rigid mount and narrow beam to provide precise angle metric accuracy. The combination of metric accuracy, wide bandwidth, and high Doppler-resolution capabilities makes them excellent sensors for real-time discrimination, for they can provide extremely accurate identification-processing estimates of motion differences caused by mass imbalances on real and threat-like targets.

    i posted this not to tom-tom indian defence news but to HIGHLIGHT the necessity to use the strenghts of many nations defence industry to increase the potency of a weapon system.
    eg here israeli radars r the best in all most all parameters plus maintenance servicing etc.
    russian ABM capable missiles r one of the best which can be acquire from abroad.
    combining the missiles and tech. etc from russia and radars and tech.etc from israeli plus with home grown backend technologies will produce a UNIQUE system which neither russian or israel will be reluctant to export and will be highly capable to the original systems ie russian version of S400 (non-export) .
    nigerian will be well adviced to take note of such developments and use it in future for any system if/as she deems fit.
    it is my opinion only
    regards.

    • lachit says:

      typo
      nigeria**** will be well adviced to take note of such developments and use it in future for any system if/as she deems fit.
      it is my opinion only
      regards.

    • gbash10 says:

      @Lachit,true talk about integrating different Hi-Tech weapon system to carter for our own defence/security requirements.
      The ULTRA-C1 and ULTRA-C22 are the air surveillance aesa radar I would recommend for my country Nigeria to acquire and then integrate it with either the S-400 Triumf/SA-21 Gargyl or the F-2000/HQ-9 SAM system.
      The ULTRA-C1 is almost similar in configuration with the Saab’s Giraffe air surveillance radar.Then Israelis have a lot air defence stuff that we may need to introduce into the NAF’s Air Combat Capabilities.Such capabilities are ELTA-ELL-8251 Escort Jamming System,ELL-8222/8212 EW Comprehensive Self-protection Jamming Pod,ELTA-ELM-2084MMR(which i suspect the ULTRA-C1 -medium range mobile system) and the Long Range MMR static AESA radars.
      The Israelis are very good at what they do,the question now is,will the US government allow them to sale some of these systems to Nigeria ?

  32. colloid says:

    Is someone watching NTA now? The “incoming” Minister-Of-Defense is being scrutinized on what he will do “differently” from what others have done.
    He made mention of a Military complex established at the same time with that of Brazil and one other African country. He noted that the Nigerian Military Complex is lagging behind his “mates” in term of weapons production– says Brazil complex can’t ever be compared to Nigeria’s own.

    Seems, he will do something “differently” from what we are being offered and had been offered.
    We hope it won’t be a “PROMISE-OF-MISS”.

    • He also mentioned that the development of weapons must be private sector driven and that for the private sector to key into the industry they have to be guaranteed a customer for their products.

  33. colloid says:

    @ Oga Lachit, it’s been quite a long time. Hope all is well? GoodAfternoon— here in Nigeria
    GoodEvening—there in India.

    • jimmy says:

      oga Colloid
      For those of us in the diaspora, please can you give us a summary
      The President himself MENTIONED the Military Industrial Complex, and since the soon to DEF.Minister is mentioning it , I hope that both MEN will follow through. They see each other everyday, so it is hoped that this will be the reality.

      • Capt Tobias Wilcock says:

        It will be nice to see what they make of Proforce and others that have already committed so much funds to pioneering this complex. action speaks loader than words.

    • lachit says:

      @colloid
      had some interviews pretty hectic and had to travel all over the country.
      good afternoon to u too
      regards

  34. Capt Tobias Wilcock says:

    Dear Ogas, Nigerian military is not helpless and always subserviant and asking for help as if it has no clue, true it is in need of assistance ( except if all the men sent on all this very expensive training course are from a pool of interlectually challenged people) . It is worrisome that we are presented as having no clue after all that has happened.
    Pls quote as as follows
    It may be useful to look at the words in terms of their etymological origins. Help is Anglo-Saxon, assist is French. Help is used in concrete situations, in general, in ordinary life . Assist is used in formal, academic, and institutional situations, as in surgery, where it often means just watching and very occasionally doing something useful, or international diplomacy, where it might mean any sort of request someone else finds useful.
    Aid – in modern English, is more appropriate for non-human help
    Assist – would be help for something that someone could do themselves but because of the assistance is able to do that thing more efficiently, profitably, effectively, etc.
    Help – is the most generic term and can refer to any sort of support.
    Facilitate – is help that is necessary for a thing to be done or that improves the utility of that thing to such a degree that it would not be worth doing but for the facilitation.
    Assist means to give help or support, especially as a subordinate or supplement; aid.
    Help is a synonym of assist without being associated with subordination or mechanical devices.
    In a strict sense, assistance implies a subordination of the assistant ( Britain) in a way that help does not.

    Webster’s describes the difference in this way: “HELP carries a strong implication of advance toward an objective (every little bit helps)…. ASSIST distinctively imputes a secondary role to the assistant or a secondary character (Britain) to the assistance (Nigeria is core executioner of the task and knows what it needs to apply to execute the required task).

    Oga Ola, On the matter of disciple, I can but agree more than ever, it forms the pivot of every military and the British soldier is a master of it, it made the little island nation colonize the world at it’s prime, The historical basis of the British professional force is different from that grew from the volunteer minute man.
    The amatuer video footag of the Nigerian soldiers does not reflect on that individuals training, there is a lot of circumstatnce that may have put him in tht position trainined or not, just the same that put many British marines/soldiers in hermam Afganistan in the open. his primary response would have been his firearm, but what if he was out of ammo. what if he waited to cover the retreat of his comrades.
    He did the warriors thing, he did not surrender to be butchered and fought hand to hand and appeared to have taken his initial attacker down, I am thought and trained that if the situation cannot be helped and I should feel your blade in my heart, you would definately be feeling my blade in yours and there is no disgrace in that.
    the position that troope found himself is wrong and might go well to be a great problem with tatical deployment than individual training or his will to fight. It should not be a thing of pride that any military puts his troops in that position.

    “Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” ~ Abraham Lincoln
    Discipline starts from well outside the battle field, the barracks, parade, interraction with civilian populace and comliance with laws and on the road.
    The British assistance is welcome.

    • lachit says:

      “Discipline starts from well outside the battle field, the barracks, parade, interraction with civilian populace and comliance with laws and on the road.”
      it is nice to see such subtle points being pointed out which usually r not even highlighted.

      in my country we have sainik school “military schools” which grooms childrens right from 7-8 years in military type discipline etc.
      i dont know if nigeria has such schools , if yes it would do good to increase the numbers.
      if no then such schools can be established via private-military cooperation.

      this is not the solution but one of the solution to the ones u already suggested.

      as regards to the british it was the non comissioned officers especially the corporal, sergent etc who were responsible for the excellent discipline in the haydays of colonial british.

  35. Capt Tobias Wilcock says:

    The F7 grew out of basically a point defence aircraft ( MIG -21s) with very potent interceptor platform capabilities, it can carry out ground strikes ( about the same or less ordnance than the A-Jet, due to it’s design to carry lighter weighing AA missiles for it’s primary high speed intercept missions aimed at dedicated bombers), but that hardly makes it a COIN aircraft, which was designed with very efficient handling capabilities, fuel/endurance at low altitudes and low speed regimes. We are once again applying the aircraft not appropriate for the task at the other end of the spectrum ( like A- Jets), The cause of the crash has not been ascertained, the maintenance of this light fighter is not has heavy and complex to that required by the heavy metals/ SU30s.
    A lot of the SU-30 operators fly this F7s along even during operation.
    Another question would be the level of experience of the crew, Pls I do not in any way doubt their competence. but if you are pushing the envelope then there must be matching skills and level of experience in that activity. Venezuela recently lost an SU-30 during a drug interdiction operation, wrong aircraft for the task. The COIN tasks require high maneuverability at low speed and altitude. This young Tigers are very precious and must not be wasted for any reason ( they are the crew of our future 4/5th generation platforms). Why has it become so difficult to get the proper COIN aircraft, why must things be continuously be done hap hazard. It all bears a price no matter how it is painted. Like I mentioned a while a go I am yet to see a Doc Adadevoh here that would bluntly refuse to apply the wrong treatment and stand up for our young heroes. May the soul of the lost flyers rest in peace and condolence to their families, friend , loved ones and their Squadron brothers.

    • Number One says:

      Oga there are home grown/built platforms for COIN.Instead of buying the Tucano from Brazil,the NAFIT can go through the blueprints of the air beetle(with its multi-fuel engine) and the Farawa.

      • Capt Tobias Wilcock says:

        Better still we a similar deployment like the Russian did to Syria, that takes care of the immediate issue on ground and also puts us in a strategic level for the future, I remember someone on this blog calculating the cost of initial 28 aircraft deployed, we could go to bring up the strenght of the offensive assets to attack helicopters to 12 x Mi24/35 and fixed wing assets to 12 x SU25, 12 x SU 30 ( or 6 x 30 & 6 x SU32 for regional reacgh), the Air beetle is under powered for COIN ops and a single engined, worse than not aving the right aircraft and lossing to atrition is getting shot down by BH, after immediate fix , we can get the blue print for the South African – AHRLAC aircraft, redesign the engine to take the Czech Walter which is a copy of the PW as a long term fix, right now we need something that can come on immeidately.

  36. Oluwafemi Maduka says:

    I just watched a B/H video and I saw a T72 backing out in presence of some boko fighters that were moving menacingly towards it…what happened to its antiaircraft gun? Let’s even assume it ran out of ammo(which is most unlikely)couldn’t the driver have just crushed the bokoharam fighters and send them in disarray? Couldn’t the driver have just fired one or two rounds of the 125mm at the fighters just to unnerve them?…Can someone pls explain this

  37. jimmy says:

    Oga SIR KAY
    Much respect for your comments but respectfully here is my cautious take and I am wrong pele/ biko/ I beg no vex.
    If the bh collaborator is carrying gasoline in polythene bags, it means …… bh has a shortage of jerry cans, there have been pictures shared by OGA Henry AND Bidexii showing what i would term Storage / Safe houses seizures these house are deep inside the forests.some of the cars being seized were covered meaning Intel is uncovering stuff.

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